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Andrews Forest LTER Monthly Meetings & Science Hour

Monthly meetings are used to share science, news, and opportunities related to the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research program. The meetings begin with a science hour and then move into program news and announcements. Anyone is welcome to attend. Monthly meetings are on the first Friday of the month during the academic year. For the 2016/17 meetings, please mark your calendar for 9-11 AM, for October 7, November 4, December 2, January 13, February 3, March 3, April 7, May 5, June 2. We will meet in Room 20 of the Forestry Sciences Lab, 3200 SW Jefferson Way.




 
OSU symphony. photo by OSU Music inspired by the Andrews Forest

Paul Miller, aka DJ Spooky, the composer, visited the Andrews Forest over four seasons. Based on his experience, Paul composed "Heart of the Forest," which premiered at Oregon State University in spring 2016. http://djspooky.com/heart-of-a-forest/

Paul talked about his experience with and connection to the Andrews Forest on the Oregon Public Radio program, "Think Out Loud."    Listen to the interview at: http://www.opb.org/radio/programs/thinkoutloud/segment/music-inspired-by-the-forest-cycling-in-the-forest-playing-music-in-the-forest/



 
Oregon Seasons Tracker image Oregon Seasons Tracker Citizen Science Program

The Oregon Season Tracker Citizen Science Program just unveiled a hybrid (mix online/classroom) training. The program connects volunteers with researchers to study weather and ecology. Volunteers collect data on precipitation and native plant seasonal changes in their backyard, farm, woodland, or schoolyard.  Learn more about the Oregon Season Tracker (OST) program at http://oregonseasontracker.forestry.oregonstate.edu

A live registration link http://bit.ly/OregonSeasonTrackerTraining

Oregon Season Tracker is run by OSU Extension, with partnership with the Andrews Forest program. We are looking to increase the number of volunteers collecting data as citizen scientists at observation sites at their home, farm, woodland or school.  Non-scientists as well as students (grade 4-12 with teacher support) are capable of learning the protocols and reporting data.  The data collected by Oregon Season Tracker volunteers will help scientists at the Andrews Forest and elsewhere fill gaps and expand the scale and inference of their research.  

It is a great family activity that can be shared with friends and neighbors, plus researchers are welcome to participate too!



 
Varied Thrush. Photo by Matt Betts Monthly Meeting: April 7, FSL Room 20. Climate. Birds. Conservation Ethics. Hydrologic Connectivity.

9am - Science Hour

The Andrews Forest will host a review team from NSF in early August to review the LTER7 grant.  To prepare for this, the midterm review presenters will deliver practice 10-minute talks in the science hours for March through June.  Each talk will be followed by a 5 to 10-minute feedback session in which we hope the audience will provide suggestions about clarifying and refining the key stories and linking them to other LTER7 research.  Thanks in advance for your participation and feedback!

9:00-9:20.  "Climate of the Andrews Forest viewed from landscape to regional scales: what can we say about the future?" - Chris Daly, Northwest Alliance for Computational Science and Engineering (NACSE), OSU

9:20-9:40.  "Old growth, birds and microclimate,” Matt Betts, Forest Ecosystems and Society, OSU

9:40-10:00.  "Threads of Continuity": Conservation Ethics at the Andrews" – Michael Nelson, Chelsea Batavia, Forest Ecosystems and Society, OSU 

10:00-10:20.  "Hydrologic connectivity during base flow conditions," Catalina Segura, Forest Engineering and Resource Management, OSU

10:20 am - General meeting and discussion

Publications report out

Graduate student report

LTER-NEON Synthesis Workshop

Kathy Keable retirement

Andrews Forest Site report

Willamette National Forest Report

Monthly meetings are used to share science, news, and opportunities related to the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research program. We start with a science hour and then move into program news and announcements. Anyone is welcome to attend.  Monthly meetings are on the first Friday of the month during the academic year (upcoming: May 5, Jun 2) in Room 20 of the Forestry Sciences Lab, 3200 SW Jefferson Way.



 
small stream at the Andrews Forest. photo by Lina DiGregorio Research Experience for Undergraduates in Small Watershed Biogeochemistry

Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) in Small Watershed Biogeochemistry at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon

The H.J. Andrews REU Program provides opportunities for undergraduates interested in systems ecology to experience hands-on participation in research in a variety of disciplines under the tutelage of experienced faculty members and graduate students. Students are granted stipends, university housing, and assistance with travel and food expenses.

The student selected for the Small Watershed REU position will assist in a novel project using water isotopes and biochemical properties of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to understand the complex relationships among hydrologic flow paths, mountain terrain, and fluxes of DOC from land to stream, addressing hydrologic connectivity in mountainous ecosystems and how these connection influence ecosystem processes. 

Applicants should have a strong background and interest in chemistry, ecology, and/or biochemistry, and be willing to learn new analytical techniques as well as conduct field work in mountainous terrain.  There are several independent projects that the student can choose from, including assessing how to “fingerprint” DOC, how isotopes of water can help us understand the flow of water through soil, or how different vegetation types can influence the sources and structure of DOC. 

Students will be able to interact with faculty, graduate students, and other undergraduate researchers for their project and also who are working across many other disciplines at the Andrews Forest.  Each student will be required to give a 20-minute talk and submit a written report about their project.

Applications are welcome from students from all schools. Students who are in those groups traditionally underrepresented in sciences (women, members of underrepresented minorities, and those with disabilities) are particularly urged to apply. REU participants are paid a stipend during the summer. Please note, NSF-funded participants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

If you are interested in participating and would like to learn more, please contact Kate Lajtha at lajthak@oregonstate.edu.



 
Andrews Forest canopy. photo by Lina DiGregorio Undergraduate position in wireless network monitoring

Wireless Network of Bots for Monitoring Ecosystem of Forest

We are seeking applicants for an NSF-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) position in summer 2017 to make a wireless network of bots for monitoring the ecosystem of forest at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest. This research will contribute to the location based open source sensors project which is currently conducted by the Cartography and Geovisualization group at College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science at Oregon State University.

  The position will be based at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest (on the west slope of the Oregon Cascades near Blue River, Oregon); travel will be required for short trips to Oregon State University (Corvallis, Oregon). The Andrews Forest was established in 1948 as an US Forest Service Experimental Forest, and since 1980 is one of the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites. The field station has modern apartments with full kitchens, a well-equipped computer lab, and wireless internet (seehttp://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/ for more information on the site, facilities and research programs at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest). The landscape is home to iconic Pacific Northwest old-growth forests of cedar and hemlock, and moss-draped ancient Douglas firs; steep terrain; and fast, cold-running streams.

The 10-week program will fit student on either the quarter or semester systems. The REU student will conduct supervised and guided research and develop his/her own individual project related to the grant. Participants will closely work with the PIs of the project and a team of students working on the grant. Housing and a weekly stipend of $550 will be provided.

Position Requirements: Applicants should

•    Exhibit proficient skills to design Arduino or Raspberry sensors;

•    Understand the fundamental mechanism of wireless network;

•    Familiar with GPS/GNSS receivers and interested in location based services;

•    A general understanding of python, database and web mapping techniques is desirable.

The applicant is expected to mostly stay in Corvallis, and occasionally travel to H.J. Andrews Forest. To survive in the forest, applicants should have a valid driver’s license in order to commute between Corvallis and the study site at the Forest, prove her or his ability to carry a heavy pack (40+ lb) for moderate distances over uneven terrain, and be comfortable spending several days at the base in the H.J. Andrews Forest to test and deploy the bots.

Eligibility is limited to currently enrolled undergraduates that have a graduate date no sooner than fall 2017. Further, all applicants must be U.S. Citizens or permanent residents. Applications from women, underrepresented minorities, and persons with disabilities are especially encouraged to apply.

To apply: Please send a brief cover letter indicating your interest, experience and professional goals after graduation, curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts and the names, addresses, phone number, and email address of at least two references to: Bo Zhao (zhao2@oregonstate.edu). Review of applications will start March 13, 2017 and continue until a suitable candidate is identified.



 
A Call to Life Poster A Call to Life event. April 7

With music, creative writing, and science, A Call to Life, affirms the wonder and worth of the Earth's wild lives and our responsibility to save them from extinction.

Friday, April 7th, 7 PM, the LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th Street, Corvallis.

FREE. Reserve your seat at liberalarts.oregonstate.edu/ACalltoLife



 
Discovery Trail at the Andrews Forest. photo by Lina DiGregorio Monthly Meeting: March 3, FSL Room 20. Pollinators, Education, Long-Term Records

9am - Science Hour

9:00-9:20 AM: "The influence of alpine meadow loss and fragmentation on pollination and rufous hummingbird movements” presented by Sarah Frey, FES.

9:20-9:40 AM: “Education and teacher activities, Discovery Trail" presented by Kari O’Connell and Mark Schulze

9:40-10 AM: “Long-term climate and hydrology - homeostasis in old-growth forests” presented by Julia Jones

10 AM - General meeting and discussion

Monthly meetings are used to share science, news, and opportunities related to the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research program. We start with a science hour and then move into program news and announcements. Anyone is welcome to attend.  Monthly meetings are on the first Friday of the month during the academic year (upcoming: Apr 7, May 5, Jun 2) in Room 20 of the Forestry Sciences Lab, 3200 SW Jefferson Way.



 
SB&F logo Best Hands-On Science Book award

Author Judith Li and illustrator M. L. Herring attended the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Boston to accept the 2017 SB&F Prize for the Best Hands-On Science Book, Ricky's Atlas: Mapping a Land on Fire.  Judy Li, who worked at the Andrews Forest, also published Ellie's Log: Exploring the Forest Where the Great Tree Fell, which features landscapes and animals of the Andrews Forest.  See more on Ellie and Ricky at http://ellieslog.osupress.oregonstate.edu/



 
Forest Under Story book cover Andrews Forest book featured in High Country News

The HJ Andrews Experimental Forest LTER site and the book, "Forest Under Story," were featured in the February issue of High Country News: http://www.hcn.org/issues/49.3/forest-under-story-creative-inquiry-in-an-old-growth-forest



 
Music from the Forest flyer. by Justin Ralls Justin Ralls doctoral recital, "Music from the Forest"

Wednesday, March 1, 2017, 8-9 PM

Original music and soundscape compositions inspired by the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest, Yellowstone National Park, and indigeneous rights and activism.

Room 190 Aasen-Hull Hall, University of Oregon.

www.justinralls.com 



 
Mack Creek gage station. Photo by Lina DiGregorio Long-Term Ecological Research presented at the ASLO Meeting

"Scientists present El Niño, other long-term ecological research results at the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) annual meeting, Feb. 27 to March 3."

See the NSF press release: https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=190945&org=NSF&from=news

The meeting will include a presentation by Andrews Forest graduate student, Francisco Guerrero-Bolano, titled, "Decoding Resilience in the Oregon Cascades: An Analysis of Historical Trends of Streamflow Variability.



 
Critical Zone diagram, provided by Critical Zone and Society National Critical Zone Observatory Webinar Series

http://criticalzone.org/national/

  • February 28 at 3PM EST: The Most Critical CZ Problems Susan Brantley, Penn State University
  • March 14 at 3PM EST: Critical Zone Services David Breshears & Jason Field, University of Arizona
  • March 28 at 3PM EST: Blue Revolution: Water scarcity in a changing world Praveen Kumar, University of Illinois
  • April 11 at 3PM EST: Drought resilience and water security Roger Bales, University of California-Merced
  • April 25 at 3PM EST: Forecasting of Earth surface processes Jon Pelletier, University of Arizona
  • May 9 at 3PM EST: Policy Relevance of Critical Zone Science Steve Banwart, University of Leeds


 
Andrews Forest tree in winter. Photo by Lina DiGregorio. Andrews Forest featured on science radio show

The Andrews Forest program was featured on radio KBVR Corvallis (88.7 FM), "Chariots of Curiosity" with Sami Al-AbdRabbuh.

https://soundcloud.com/sami-alabdrabbuh/episode-20170217



 
Lookout Creek in the Snow. photo by Lina DiGregorio. Monthly Meeting: Feb 3, FSL Room 20. Science Communication; Floodplain Restoration.

9 AM - Science Hour

"Engaging with Society: Insights from the Science of Science Communication" presented by Karen McLeod, COMPASS Interim Executive Director.

“A fearless approach to floodplain restoration on national forest lands" presented by Johan Hogervorst, USFS Forest Hydrologist, and Kate Meyer, USFS fish biologist.

10 AM - General meeting and discussion

Monthly meetings are used to share science, news, and opportunities related to the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research program. We start with a science hour and then move into program news and announcements. Anyone is welcome to attend.  Monthly meetings are on the first Friday of the month during the academic year (upcoming: Mar 3, Apr 7, May 5, Jun 2) in Room 20 of the Forestry Sciences Lab, 3200 SW Jefferson Way.



 
Stream research at the Andrews Forest. photo by Lina DiGregorio Monthly Meeting: January 13, FSL Room 20. Stream Chemistry, Tree Mortality and Forest Change
9 AM - Science Hour

"Long term chemistry dynamics in streams at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest" presented by Sherri Johnson, USFS, Stream Ecologist, and Alba Argerich, OSU FERM Department.

“A Permanent Plot Perspective on Tree Mortality and Forest Change.” presented by David Bell (USFS PNW), David Shaw (OSU FES), and Rob Pabst (OSU FES)

10 AM - General meeting and discussion

Monthly meetings are used to share science, news, and opportunities related to the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research program. We start with a science hour and then move into program news and announcements. Anyone is welcome to attend. Monthly meetings are on the first Friday of the month during the academic year (upcoming: Feb 3, Mar 3, Apr 7, May 5, Jun 2) in Room 20 of the Forestry Sciences Lab, 3200 SW Jefferson Way.



 
Meadow at the Andrews Forest. Photo by Lina DiGregorio Monthly Meeting: Dec 2, FSL Room 20. Hydrological buffering, Genetic diversity

9 AM - Science Hour

“Hydrological buffering via feedbacks in canopy-scale connectivity” presented by David Noone, Professor, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, OSU

“The role of pollinator movement and landscape structure on population genetic diversity and connectivity of Western columbine across Andrews Forest meadow communities” presented by Andy Jones, Assistant Professor, Botany and Plant Pathology, OSU.

10 AM - General meeting and discussion

Monthly meetings are used to share science, news, and opportunities related to the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research program. We start with a science hour and then move into program news and announcements. Anyone is welcome to attend.  Monthly meetings are on the first Friday of the month during the academic year (upcoming: Jan 13, Feb 3, Mar 3, Apr 7, May 5, Jun 2) in Room 20 of the Forestry Sciences Lab, 3200 SW Jefferson Way.



 
McRae Creek, Andrews Forest. Photo by Lina DiGregorio/OSU Landscape disturbance and geomorphic processes, McRae Creek

GEOG 596 field class presentation

Wednesday, November 9

1-2 PM

Wilkinson 207

 



 
Andrews Forest canopy. Photo by Lina DiGregorio/OSU LTER Seminars Series, OSU and online

Seminar: Mass Balance in Watershed Science. Gene Likens, Founding Director, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Offered through the online seminar series, "Long Term Ecological Research: Advancing Ecological Theory."


Facilitated via Adobe Connect, November 4, 1:00-2:30 PM, OSU Nash Hall Room 32. All career stages are welcome! Previous seminars (starting Aug 26th) will be recorded and available online.


The seminar series FW 507 CRN 20930 “Long Term Ecological Research: Advancing Ecological Theory” will engage scientists from key theoretical fields of ecology to speak about how long term research informs the evolution of that theory. Each week we will hear from a different speaker and then discuss how long term investigations in that field enhance forecasts of ecological change; what frameworks and datasets are necessary to do so; and outline key ecological questions that are only testable through long term approaches.


Course content. As the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network enters into its 35th year, the opportunity for long-term data to address critical questions that advance general ecological theory and understanding has never been more informed. Course objectives are to identify important, general ecological questions that a) derive from key theories, b) are motivated by the analysis of long-term data, and c) require additional, long-term data collection to be answered by hearing from key ecologists who have been informing ecological theory through their long term research. We will: 1) discuss the importance of long term investigations for enhancing forecasts of future ecological patterns, 2) discuss the essential components of a successful integrated framework for long term core datasets, and 3) outline important general ecological questions and theories that are only tenable through continued long-term data collection and analysis.


How to participate. If you wish to take this course for credit, you need to enroll at your home institution. If you simply wish to sit in on the lectures, you are welcome to do so without formally enrolling. In either case, please email the course organizers, Evelyn Gaiser (gaisere@fiu.edu) and John Kominoski (jkominos@fiu.edu), so that they can add you to the email list for course-related announcements. All you’ll need is a computer with a high-speed connection to the internet.



 
watershed 1 slope at the Andrews Forest. photo by Lina DiGregorio/OSU PhD student opening. Landscape Ecology, Modeling, Mapping & Analysis

The Landscape Ecology, Modeling, Mapping & Analysis (LEMMA) team at Oregon State University’s College of Forestry (lemma.forestry.oregonstate.edu) is seeking a top-performing and motivated Ph.D. student to examine forest disturbance and recovery dynamics across California, Oregon, and Washington beginning in Fall 2017. Depending on research interests and skills, the student will focus on one of two research areas: (1) quantifying biotic and abiotic factors contributing to forest disturbance and recovery patterns and (2) understanding the limitations of and improving upon predictive satellite-based vegetation maps. Applicants should take care to identify which of the two areas is of primary interest in their application materials. The student will work closely with both the department of Forest Ecosystems and Society at Oregon State University and US Forest Service scientists specializing in landscape ecology, remote sensing, and statistical modeling. While the student will work extensively with remotely sensed data, the student will collect field data in support of their research. Additionally, the student will be expected to produce at least three first-author publications as part of their research.

A competitive candidate will hold a completed a master’s degrees in ecology, environmental science, remote sensing, or related fields, and provide evidence of excellence in academic pursuits and research, a strong background in quantitative methods and GIS, programming skills and evidence of strong written and oral communication skills. Please contact Dr. Lisa Ganio (lisa.ganio@oregonstate.edu) or Dr. David Bell (dmbell@fs.fed.us) for additional information or to submit review materials (a statement of interest, CV, description of research interests and experience, GRE scores, unofficial transcripts, and contact information for three professional references).

Application review will begin November 1, 2016.



 
instrumented tree at the Andrews Forest. photo by Lina DiGregorio/OSU Monthly Meeting: Nov 4, FSL Room 20. Tree Canopies and Aquatic Invertebrates.

9 AM - Science Hour

"Reinvigorating tree canopy research at the Andrews Forest: from microclimate to ecology” presented by Chris Still, Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, Oregon State University.

“A 30-year perspective of chasing aquatic vertebrates at the HJ Andrews" presented by Stan Gregory and Ivan Arismendi, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University

10 AM - General meeting and discussion

Monthly meetings are used to share science, news, and opportunities related to the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research program. We start with a science hour and then move into program news and announcements. Anyone is welcome to attend.  Monthly meetings are on the first Friday of the month during the academic year (upcoming: Dec 2, Jan 6, Feb 3, Mar 3, Apr 7, May 5, Jun 2) in Room 20 of the Forestry Sciences Lab, 3200 SW Jefferson Way.



 
Gordon Grant Gordon Grant named 2016 American Geophysical Union fellow

Research hydrologist Gordon Grant has been named a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), becoming the first U.S. Forest Service researcher in the program’s 54-year-history to receive this prestigious scientific honor.

The AGU bestows no more than 0.1 % of its members with this recognition in any given year, reserving the competitive title for those who have made exceptional contributions to Earth and space sciences and who have gained prominence in their respective fields. Each Fellow is vetted by committees of disciplinary experts and peers.

Grant is based at the Pacific Northwest Research Station’s Forestry Sciences Laboratory in Corvallis, Oregon, and is a world-renowned expert on river processes. He was recognized for a research career spanning three decades that has furthered understanding of the geomorphic behavior of river systems and led to improved strategies for managing public lands within a watershed perspective. Grant, who received his Ph.D. in fluvial geomorphology from Johns Hopkins University, credits a 12-year career as a whitewater river guide for his fascination with rivers.

“Although AGU Fellows represent the many diverse sciences of AGU members and come from different career backgrounds, they’ve each played a leading role in promoting discovery and developing solutions for a sustainable future for Earth,” said Margaret Leinen, AGU President. “We’re pleased to recognize and honor the newest class of Fellows for their significant and lasting contributions to Earth and space sciences.”

Grant will be recognized along with the other 2016 Class of Fellows on Wednesday, December 14, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, California. For more information on AGU’s Fellow program, visit http://honors.agu.org/fellows/.

The American Geophysical Union is an international non-profit scientific organization representing nearly 60,000 members in 139 countries. It is dedicated to advancing Earth and space sciences for the benefit of humanity through its scholarly publications, including 19 scientific journals; outreach programs; and conferences, which are among the largest gatherings of Earth and space scientists in the world.

The Pacific Northwest Research Station—headquartered in Portland, Ore.—generates and communicates scientific knowledge that helps people make informed choices about natural resources and the environment. The station has 11 laboratories and centers located in Alaska, Washington, and Oregon and about 300 employees. Learn more online at http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw.



 
Waterviz image. from waterviz.org Special Seminar: Waterviz. Art-Science Collaboration

WATERVIZ: ART-SCIENCE COLLABORATION TO ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING OF THE WATER CYCLE

Wednesday October 12.  Noon. Nash Hall 33

Presenters: Artist Xavier Cortada (Florida International University), Sonification Specialist Marty Quinn (Univ. of New Hampshire)

Hosts: Fred Swanson and Brooke Penaluna on behalf of the Andrews Forest Community

WaterViz is an online water cycle visualization and sonification tool that lies at the nexus among the hydrologic sciences, education, art, and music. In this National Science Foundation-sponsored project based at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and LTER site (New Hampshire), Xavier and Marty have contributed their artistic talents to the development of WaterViz using the Hubbard Brook setting. Now, they are visiting the Andrews Forest for inspiration in adapting WaterViz for the Pacific Northwest.

Waterviz captures water cycle data every hour from a small watershed using an array of digital environmental sensors.  These data are then transmitted to the internet and used to drive an artistic visualization and sonification of the water cycle, accurately reflecting ever changing inputs, outputs, and storage of water in a small, upland forested watershed in real time.  This project includes educators who are creating lesson plans for middle and high school students, including visually impaired students, to use the Waterviz visualization and sonification as alternative ways of understanding and demonstrating pattern and process in water data.  Neuroscientists are also involved, seeking to better understand the basis of cognition, and to demonstrate how the brain actually processes information presented visually and acoustically.

For the visualization visit: waterviz.org

For the sonification visit: http://waterviz.org/listenin.shtml 

Press release:

https://necsc.umass.edu/news/forest-services-online-waterviz-tool-continues-make-waves



 
Spotted Owl pair. Photo by Alan Dyke Monthly Meeting: Oct 7, FSL Room 20. Ows, Small Mammals

9 AM - Science Hour

"Spotted Owls and Asking a Simple Question: What Interactions Govern Food Web Dynamics at the HJ Andrews?" presented by Damon Lesmeister, Research Wildlife Biologist, US Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Wildlife Ecology Team

"Small mammal population dynamics at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest: a five year summary" presented by Clint Epps, Associate Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University

10 AM - General meeting and discussion

Monthly meetings are used to share science, news, and opportunities related to the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research program. We start with a science hour and then move into program news and announcements. Anyone is welcome to attend.  Monthly meetings are on the first Friday of the month during the academic year (upcoming: Nov 4, Dec 2, Jan 6, Feb 3, Mar 3, Apr 7, May 5, Jun 2) in Room 20 of the Forestry Sciences Lab, 3200 SW Jefferson Way.



 
Ricky's Atlas book cover Author Event" "Ricky's Atlas" children's book

Judith L. Li & M.L. Herring “Ricky’s Atlas: Mapping a Land on Fire” http://osupress.oregonstate.edu/book/rickys-atlas Saturday, September 17, 3 PM Grass Roots Books & Music, Corvallis



 
BioScience cover, July 2016 "Examining Diversity Inequities in Fisheries Science: A Call to Action"

Andrews Forest researchers, Ivan Arismendi and Brooke Penaluna, snagged the cover of the July 2016 issue of the journal BioScience with their article, "Examining Diversity Inequities in Fisheries Science: A Call to Action."  The article examines the status of gender, race, and ethnicity of US fisheries scientists and shows that women and minorities represent only a small portion of the workforce. The authors urge dialog and further efforts to create a truly diverse workforce which can create a broader set of skills and experiences to approach complex human-environmental problems.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/301299816_Examining_Diversity_Inequities_in_Fisheries_Science_A_Call_to_Action



 
Hermit Warbler. photo by Sarah Frey Microclimate predicts within–season distribution dynamics of montane forest birds

Scientists are trying to understand how animals will respond to climate change across whole landscapes, but also at smaller scales -- such as within individual patches of forest. At the Andrews Forest, where the mountains, streams, and large trees create little pockets, or microclimates, of warmer or cooler areas, scientists wanted to know if birds would move into favorable microclimates within the summer breeding season. First the scientists needed to learn three things: the structure of the forest, the temperature across the forest, and the bird movement within the forest. So, they mapped the forest structure across the entire landscape using LiDAR technology. They measured temperature at different points by placing 183 temperature sensors across the forest. Six times during the summer, they counted and recorded bird presence or absence by recording all birds seen or heard across the 183 points with temperature sensors. In a study just published, the scientists, Sarah J.K. Frey, Adam S. Hadley, and Matthew G. Betts, reported that the distribution of birds across the forest did change over the summer, and fine-scale temperature metrics were the strongest predictor of bird distribution. Further, they found that some bird species preferred warmer sites, while other bird species preferred cooler sites. Under certain conditions, like those found in old-growth and mature forests, it is possible that birds can shift their location within the breeding season into suitable microclimates and, in doing so, potentially buffer themselves against larger scale climate change. The paper, "Microclimate predicts within–season distribution dynamics of montane forest birds," was published in the journal, "Diversity and Distributions," 28 June 2016.



 
Book cover for New book: "Long-Term Ecological Research: Changing the Nature of Scientists"

Edited by Michael R. Willig and Lawrence R. Walker

From Oxford University Press

"The Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program is, in a sense, an experiment to transform the nature of science, and represents one of the most effective mechanisms for catalyzing comprehensive site-based research that is collaborative, multidisciplinary, and long-term in nature. The scientific contributions of the Program are prodigious, but the broader impacts of participation have not been examined in a formal way. This book captures the consequences of participation in the Program on the perspectives, attitudes, and practices of environmental scientists.

The edited volume comprises three sections. The first section includes two chapters that provide an overview of the history, goals, mission, and inner workings of the LTER network of sites. The second section comprises three dozen retrospective essays by scientists, data managers or educators who represent a broad spectrum of LTER sites from deserts to tropical forests and from arctic to marine ecosystems. Each essay addresses the same series of probing questions to uncover the extent to which participation has affected the ways that scientists conduct research, educate students, or provide outreach to the public. The final section encompasses 5 chapters, whose authors are biophysical scientists, historians, behavioral scientists, or social scientists. This section analyzes, integrates, or synthesizes the content of the previous chapters from multiple perspectives and uncovers emergent themes and future directions."

The book contains chapters by Andrews Forest scientists Sherri Johnson, Fred Swanson, and Susan Stafford.

Format: Hardback 448 pp.  55 illustrations, 6.125" x 9.25"

ISBN-10: 019938021X

ISBN-13: 9780199380213

Publication date: August 2016



 
Reflections Exhibit Long-Term Ecological Reflections Exhibit at the World Forestry Center

An exhibit of the Long Term Ecological Reflections program of The H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest now be viewed at the World Forestry Center Discovery Museum in Washington Park.

The Andrews Forest exhibit, which is displayed on the museum’s second floor, features breathtaking photographs and excerpts of poems and essays from more than 70 of the nation’s most accomplished writers. Each of the written pieces were created through the Long-Term Ecological Reflections program — a partnership between the Forest Service and the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature and the Written Word at Oregon State — which encourages writers to live in the forest for one to two weeks and record their observations. Many of these works are also part of a larger anthology, Forest Under Story: Creative Inquiry in an Old-Growth Forest. In this book, writers describe how science and human experience go hand-in-hand in understanding the significance of old-growth forests and watersheds.

Visitors can check out the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest exhibit through Dec. 31. The World Forestry Center welcomes all ages, and the cost for visiting the museum (including all exhibits) is listed below:

$7 for adults

$6 for seniors (age 62+)

$5 for youth (ages 3 to 18)

Free for children under 3

For more information about the World Forestry Center, visit worldforestry.org.

http://oregonstate.edu/portland/science-and-creativity-merge-hj-andrews-experimental-forest-exhibit 



 
Mary Beth Leigh Seminar: Reintegration of the Arts, Humanities, and Sciences. Mary Beth Leigh.

Seeing the Elephant: Towards Reintegration of the Arts, Humanities, and Sciences in Ecological Research

Friday, June 17, 2016, 1:30-2:30 PM, Richardson Hall 107

Mary Beth Leigh is an Associate Professor of Microbiology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks as well as a dancer, choreographer, and musician. She is a founding member of Deliquescent Designs dance company and is an organizer of state and national efforts to integrate the arts and humanities with place-based ecological science, including the Alaska-based program, In a Time of Change, and the nationwide Ecological Reflections program within the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) network.

SUMMARY: Collaborations between the arts, humanities and sciences can engage us at the intellectual, intuitive and emotional levels, and can strengthen our connection to the ecosystems in which we live. This talk highlights projects combining ecology, dance, visual art, and ethics to advance the arts, humanities, sciences, and public understanding of social-ecological issues across Alaska and the nationwide network of place-based ecological research sites. Dr. Leigh’s presentation is an expanded version of a TEDx talk she recently was invited to give in Fairbanks, Alaska.



 
HJA Day 2015. Photo by Lina DiGregorio HJA Day at the Andrews Forest. June 23, 2016.

HJA Day is the annual field gathering at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site in Blue River, Oregon.  The event features presentations and field trips about research, education, management, and the arts and humanities.

The event is hosted by the Andrews Forest LTER Program.  Transportation from the OSU campus will be provided, as will morning refreshments and an afternoon snack. Participants should bring a sack lunch to eat in the field.

To help us in our planning, registration is required by June 16th. Go to http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/hjaday for more information and to register.

We look forward to seeing you there!



 
Andrews Forest landscape. photo by Lina DiGregorio. PhD Student Research Assistant Opportunity

PhD Student Research Assistant: Terrestrial carnivore and owl food web ecology. Oregon State University. Posted on the Andrews Forest Opportunities page.



 
meadow in the Andrews Forest. photo by Lina DiGregorio M.S. Thesis Defense: Kate Jones. Tree Establishment.

"Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Tree Establishment in the M1 Meadow of the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest”

Kate Jones

M.S., Geography

Advisor: Dr. Julia Jones

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

9:00am

Burt 193



 
stream sampling at the Andrews Forest. photo by Lina DiGregorio Monthly Meeting: June 3, Valley Library, Autzen classroom.

Friday, June 3, 2016, 9 AM – 11 AM, in the Valley Library, Autzen classroom, 2nd (main) floor.  NOTE SPECIAL LOCATION!!  Enter main library doors opening onto the quad, proceed through detectors, bear left, Autzen classroom is on your right.

9am - Science Hour

First 1/2 hour: “Effects of the summer 2015 drought on fish, salamanders, and stream nutrients in the McRae Creek basin.”  Dana Warren, Assistant Professor, Dept of Forest Ecosystems and Society & Dept. of Fisheries and Wildlife

Second 1/2 hour:  Visit the exhibit in the OSU Archives, 5th floor, Valley Library  “Heartwood: Inquiry and Engagement with Pacific Northwest Forests”

10 AM - General meeting and discussion

This is our last monthly meeting of the 2015-2016 academic year. The next meeting will be October 2016.



 
symposium 2016 Symposium Presentations now online

Presentations from the symposium are now available for online viewing on the "2016 Andrews Forest Annual Symposium" playlist on the Andrews Forest YouTube channel.


The Andrews Forest Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Symposium highlights the program’s research, recent findings, and new directions. The 2016 symposium, held May 13th, 2016, featured eight talks around the theme, “Stories Only Time Can Tell,” inspired by the long-term nature of the research at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research site.



 
OSU Wind Ensemble “Heart of the Forest” musical performance

Wednesday, May 18, 7:30 pm

Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky, “Heart of the Forest,” and other works performed by the OSU Wind Ensemble

LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th Street, Corvallis

Composer, artist, and author Paul D. Miller (aka DJ Spooky) will debut his latest composition, “Heart of the Forest,” with the Oregon State University Wind Ensemble under the direction of Dr. Christopher Chapman. 

Tickets are $10 at the door or $7 in advance and can be purchased here. Student admission is free.

Paul Miller composed “Heart of the Forest” as an artist-in-residence at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest as part of the Spring Creek Project’s Long-Term Ecological Reflections program. Miller first rose to worldwide fame as hip-hop turntablist "DJ Spooky" and is known for his multimedia art, catalogue of music, and social justice work. In addition to collaborating with musicians, such as Chuck D, Thurston Moore and Yoko Ono, Miller has travelled the world to perform solo and with chamber groups and orchestras. This project is a collaboration between the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word; School of Arts and Communication at OSU; and OSU Wind Ensemble, with funding provided by the Oregon Community Foundation’s Creative Heights program and the USDA Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station.



 
Heartwood exhibit. Photo by Lina DiGregorio. Heartwood Highlighted

The "Heartwood: Inquiry and Engagement with Pacific Northwest Forests" display at the Valley Library is featured in Terra's blog:

http://oregonstate.edu/terra/2016/05/a-forest-pastiche/ 



 
Andrews Forest Newsletter Spring 2016 cover Andrews Forest Newsletter Spring 2016

The Spring 2016 issue of the Andrews Forest Newsletter is online at http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/newsletter.

  • Learn how old-growth forests may buffer understory temperatures in a warming climate 
  • Find out how ethics have a role in natural resource management and ecological forestry
  • Bid farewell to two notable retirees, John Moreau and Theresa Valentine.
  • Track snowmelt in a mountain ecotone


 
2015 Andrews Forest Symposium. Photo by Lina DiGregorio Andrews Forest LTER Symposium: May 13th

Please join us at the upcoming HJ Andrews Experimental Forest Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) 2016 Symposium: "Stories Only Time Can Tell"

9 AM - 2:30 PM, Friday, May 13th, 2016

Memorial Union, Oregon State University Campus

Hosted by the Andrews Forest Long-Term Ecological Research Program

The agenda of speakers and titles is listed on the symposium webpage



 
Ricky's Atlas book cover Ricky's Atlas. A sequel to Ellie's Log

"Ricky's Atlas: Mapping a Land on Fire" by Judith L. Li

In this sequel to "Ellie’s Log: Exploring the Forest Where the Great Tree Fell," Ricky Zamora brings his love of map-making and his boundless curiosity to the arid landscapes east of the Cascade Mountains.



 
Forest Under Story book cover "Forest Under Story" explored by Terra

In a post titled, "Notes from a Forest," OSU's Terra blog explores the recently-released book borne from the Long-Term Ecological Reflections program at the Andrews Forest: "Forest Under Story." Check out the post at http://oregonstate.edu/terra/2016/05/notes-from-a-forest/.



 
SW Tasmania. Global Environmental Change Lab, PSU Monthly Meeting: May 6, FSL Room 20. Governance, and Disturbance Reconstructions

9 AM - Science Hour

“Incorporating Considerations of Forest Governance into Long Term Ecological Research at the Andrews Forest." Hannah Gosnell, Associate Professor of Geography, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, OSU

“Disturbance reconstructions in temperate forests in Patagonia and Tasmania.” Andrés Holz, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, School of the Environment, Portland State University

10 AM - General meeting and discussion

Monthly meetings are used to share science, news, and opportunities related to the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research program. We start with a science hour and then move into program news and announcements. Anyone is welcome to attend.  Monthly meetings are on the first Friday of the month during the academic year.



 
Heartwood Invitation Heartwood: Inquiry and Engagement with Pacific Northwest Forests

People of the Pacific Northwest have deep and complicated connections with forests. The OSU Libraries and Press Special Collections and Archives Research Center explores those connections in its latest exhibit: Heartwood: Inquiry and Engagement with Pacific Northwest Forests. The exhibit represents a joint effort of OSU’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center, the US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station, and the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature and the Written Word. An extensive collection of images, early maps, artifacts, and literary excerpts honoring forests is on display. Several Andrews Forest folks assisted Archives staff and Spring Creek Project colleagues in assembling this display addressing the forest as habitat, provider, laboratory, studio, sanctuary, and classroom. Display items and a timeline trace evolving human relations with forests in the Pacific Northwest from ca. 1900 to the present—and into the future. The over-arching message: we are thoroughly connected with the region’s forests and the nature of these connections changes inexorably over time. If you are unable to attend the opening reception, you may still visit the exhibit, on display at the OSU Valley Library 5th Floor Special Collections center through early fall.



 
Inequities poster Seminar: “Inequities in the US fisheries science workforce…another inconvenient truth”

Dr. Ivan Arismendi & Dr. Brooke Penaluna Monday, April 18, 10 AM, Room 32 Nash Hall Free and open to the public. This forum provides a starting point for discussions about how disparities of diversity in fisheries compare to other disciplines and what might be done to improve the climate and conditions for the successful inclusion of diverse scientists.



 
Forest Under Story cover image New Book: "Forest Under Story: Creative Inquiry in an Old-Growth Forest"

Forest Under Story: Creative Inquiry in an Old-Growth Forest

Edited by Nathaniel Brodie, Charles Goodrich, and Frederick J. Swanson

Two kinds of long-term research are taking place at the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest, a renowned research facility in the temperate rain forest of the Oregon Cascades. Here, scientists investigate the ecosystem's trees, wildlife, water, and nutrients with an eye toward understanding change over varying timescales up to two hundred years or more. And writers from both literary and scientific backgrounds spend time in the forest investigating the ecological and human complexities of this remarkable and deeply studied place.

This anthology—which includes work by some of the nation's most accomplished writers, including Sandra Alcosser, Alison Hawthorne Deming, Jane Hirshfield, Linda Hogan, Freeman House, Robin Wall Kimmerer, Kathleen Dean Moore, Robert Michael Pyle, Pattiann Rogers, and Scott Russell Sanders—grows out of the work of the Long-Term Ecological Reflections program and showcases the insights of the program's thoughtful and important encounters among writers, scientists, and place. These vivid essays, poems, and field notes convey a landscape of moss-draped trees, patchwork clear-cuts, stream-swept gravel bars, and hillsides scoured by fire, and also bring forward the ambiguities and paradoxes of conflicting human values and their implications for the ecosystem.

Forest Under Story offers an illuminating and multifaceted way of understanding the ecology and significance of old-growth forests, and points the way toward a new kind of collaboration between the sciences and the humanities to better know and learn from special places.

Nathaniel Brodie is a freelance writer; Charles Goodrich is a poet and director of the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word at Oregon State University; and Frederick J. Swanson is research geologist emeritus, Pacific Northwest Research Station, U.S. Forest Service.

"To learn one place in the world may be the beginning of learning our place in the world. Like the old-growth forest where they were written, these wonderfully thoughtful descriptions, essays, poems, and meditations offer rich and vigorous variety, exquisite detail, and broad vistas of time and possibility." –Ursula K. Le Guin

"In a remarkable project at Oregon's Andrews Experimental Forest, writers and scientists have been collaborating closely, looking to the land through each other’s' eyes, finding meaning in data and direct experience of the forest, deriving new questions from verse and essay. Forest Under Story brings us the gifts of this collaboration. Here some of our keenest observers and thinkers reflect on the ecological reality and human significance of long-term change. To comprehend such change, imagination and information must walk together in our stories. This wonderful collection shows us the way." –Curt Meine, author of Aldo Leopold: His Life and Work

"There are many ways to see and experience a forest and this diversity is beautifully represented in this collection of poems, essays, and observations by a diverse array of artists who participated in a long-term reflections program at the H. J. Andrews Experimental. In my nearly 60 years of studying the forests of Andrews, I remain humbled by their magnificence - and now by the deep, fresh insights of the many writers represented in this book." –Jerry Franklin, professor of forest ecosystems, University of Washington



 
Arts-Science Convergences poster Arts-Science Convergences at OSU
Thursday, April 7, 3-5 pm

OSU Memorial Union Journey Room

Scientist and artists work and think in different ways, but the process of inquiry has many common dimensions as well. How do art-science convergences happen? Why are they important or useful? What are some future prospects for art-science convergences?

In this presentation, scientists and artists will give brief illustrations of their convergent work, and then engage in a conversation with the audience on the practice of arts-science convergences. Presenters include: Jerri Bartholomew, Mark Harmon, Bob Keefer, Dana Reason, Justin Ralls, Angelique White, Leah Wilson, Charles Goodrich, and Fred Swanson. FMI: http://calendar.oregonstate.edu/event/114293/

Immediately following, we’ll help open the new exhibit “Heartwood: Inquiry and Engagement with Pacific Northwest Forests” in the 5th floor of the OSU Library with a catered reception.



 
iceberg Monthly Meeting: April 1, FSL Room 20. Antarctic LTER
9am - Science Hour

Stories from OSU colleagues who work at a sister LTER site, Palmer Station, Antarctica

First 1/2 hour talk: “Krill predator foraging ecology and population demographics in a warming Antarctic,” Ari Friedlaender, Associate Professor, Fisheries and Wildlife, and Marine Mammal Institute, OSU

Second 1/2 hour talk: “Antarctic krill recruitment determines aggregation characteristics: Implications for predator foraging and fisheries management,” Kim Bernard, Assistant Professor, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

10am - General meeting and discussion

"Oregon Season Tracker: initial results and future opportunities.” Brad Withrow-Robinson and Jody Einerson, OSU Forestry Extension



 
"ROT: The Afterlife of Trees" exhibit at the World Forestry Center

Reception on Thursday, March 10, from 4:00 - 6:00 PM (RSVP to amorrison@worldforestry.org)

Exhibit on view at from March 11 - May 1, 2016.

"ROT: The Afterlife of Trees" is a multi-media exhibit with a variety of visual, written and performing arts featuring rot and decomposing wood as the theme.

http://www.worldforestry.org/rot-the-afterlife-of-trees/

World Forestry Center, Portland, Oregon



 
Forest Under Story book cover Book launch: “Forest Under Story: Creative Inquiry in an Old-Growth Forest”

Thursday, March 31, 7 pm

Corvallis-Benton Public Library

Celebration and book launch for Forest Under Story, with readings by Charles Goodrich, Jeff Fearnside, John R. Campbell, Fred Swanson and others; slide show of forest images by photographer Bob Keefer; and live forest music composed by Justin Ralls.

Forest Under Story is a new anthology of selected works from the Long-Term Ecological Reflections program that showcases the insights of the program's thoughtful and important encounters among writers, scientists, and place. These vivid essays, poems, and field notes convey a landscape of moss-draped trees, patchwork clear-cuts, stream-swept gravel bars, and hillsides scoured by fire, and also bring forward the ambiguities and paradoxes of conflicting human values and their implications for the ecosystem. Ursula LeGuin says about Forest Under Story, "To learn one place in the world may be the beginning of learning our place in the world. Like the old-growth forest where they were written, these wonderfully thoughtful descriptions, essays, poems, and meditations offer rich and vigorous variety, exquisite detail, and broad vistas of time and possibility."



 
USFS Logo USFS Region 6 Social Science Forum

March 8, 2016 (8:30am – 4:30pm)

Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon

Meeting Objectives:  This event responds to an increased emphasis on using social science to guide forest management decisions.   For the first time in the history of the Pacific Northwest, we will create an opportunity for Forest Service managers to interact with a cadre of social scientists.  Managers in attendance will learn how social science is conducted, how it can be used, and its limitations.  Scientists will gain awareness of high priority information needs.  Together, we will develop a research agenda to inform future landscape planning efforts, including plan revisions.  This workshop will be taped and available for future viewing on the Ecoshare Website, a product of the Region 6 Ecology Program    (http://ecoshare.info/)

Contact: Cheryl Friesen cfriesen@fs.fed.us



 
Barbara Cosens. Photo courtesy of Cosens' lab. Seminar: Social-Ecological System Resilience

"Social-Ecological System Resilience, Climate Change and Adaptive Water Governance: The AWG Project”.

Barbara Cosens, Professor, University of Idaho College of Law

Wednesday, March 9, 12-1, Wilkinson 203

Professor Cosens is affiliated with the University of Idaho College of Law and the Waters of the West Graduate Program at University of Idaho. She coordinates the Natural Resources and Environmental Law Program at UI and teaches Water Law, Water Policy, Law Science and the Environment, and leads a team taught graduate course in Interdisciplinary Methods in Water Resources. Her research interests include the integration of law and science in education, water governance, and dispute resolution; adaptive water governance and resilience; and the recognition and settlement of Native American water rights. Professor Cosens will discuss a project she co-chairs made possible through support from the NSF funded Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) called "Adaptive Governance in Regional Water Systems to Manage Resilience in an Era of Changing Climate.”



 
stream at the Andrews Forest. Photo by Mark Schulze Monthly Meeting:March 4, FSL Room 20. DIRT and Streamflow

9 AM - Science Hour

“The dirt on DIRT: what we have learned over the past 20 years, and where we are going, and why it matters for the LTER ” Kate Lajtha, Professor, Crop and Soil Science, OSU

“Summer streamflow deficits from regenerating Douglas-fir forest in the Andrews and South Umpqua Experimental Forests”  Julia Jones, Professor, Geography, OSU

10 AM - General meeting and discussion

Monthly meetings are used to share science, news, and opportunities related to the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research program. We start with a science hour and then move into program news and announcements. Anyone is welcome to attend.  Monthly meetings are on the first Friday of the month during the academic year.



 
summer field work. photo by Lina DiGregorio/OSU Summer Research Opportunities at the Andrews Forest

See the Opportunities page for announcements for summer field tech positions, graduate student support, and Research for Undergraduates internships.



 
Art work by Kathleen Caprario "Rot: The Afterlife of Trees" Art Exhibit and Special Events. Jan 14 - Feb 25, 2016

WHERE: The Arts Center, 700 S.W. Madison Ave., Corvallis. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m.

HOW MUCH: Exhibit and events free and open to the public.

INFO: theartscenter.net.

Rot Exhibition Special Events

    • Artist Reception, Thursday, Jan. 21, 4 to 8 p.m., during Corvallis ArtsWalk.
    • Performance art by Kaitlyn Wittig-Mengüc, Thursday Feb. 18, 4 to 8 p.m., during Corvallis ArtsWalk.
    • Brown Bag Art Talk, Thursday, Jan. 28, noon.
    • Rot, Poetry and Music Inspired by Ecology of Decay -- a program of performing arts and music, Saturday, Feb. 20, 3 p.m.
    • See the "Rot: The Afterlife of Trees at The Arts Center" article in the Corvallis Gazette Times

 

 

 

 

 



 
Andrews Forest 2011 Flood. Photo by Mark Schulze Perspectives Across the Hydrologic Cycle Seminar

"How above-ground forest structure and below-ground water storage interact to determine forest sensitivity to changes in climate and forest management practices"  Naomi Tague (University of California, Santa Barbara: Bren School of Environmental Science & Management)

Wednesday, Feb. 10th from 4-5 PM in Peavy 101

Water Resource Graduate Program Winter 2016 Seminar Series: Perspectives Across the Hydrologic Cycle



 
musical note from freepik.com DJ Spooky: "Forests, Electronics, and Composition"

Thursday, January 14, 1-3 pm presentation; 3-4 reception

Benton Hall 303, OSU

Composer, multimedia artist and author Paul D. Miller, a.k.a. DJ Spooky, is composing a "Forest Symphony" based on his four seasonal residencies at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest. In this multi-media presentation, Miller will talk with musician / composer Dana Reason about his composition process, incorporating electronics and multimedia elements, and his experience in composing the “Forest Symphony.”  Miller is known for his genre-bending art, vast catalogue of music and work in social justice. He is the author of Book of Ice, a multimedia, multidisciplinary study of Antarctica that contemplates climate change and humanity’s relationship with the natural world, as well as Rebirth of a Nation, performed by the Kronos Quartet. FMI: http://djspooky.com/



 
Winter at the Andrews Forest (2008). Photo by Lina DiGregorio. Monthly Meeting: January 8, Forestry Sciences Lab Room 20

“Dead Wood Three Ways: Utility, Science, and Art.” Mark Harmon, Professor, Forest Ecosystems and Society

“A Critical Approach to Forest Management.”  Chelsea Batavia, PhD candidate, Forest Ecosystems and Society


10am - General meeting and discussion

  • Site Use Proposal preview: Soundscapes Research at HJA [Jesse Barber, BSU]
  • Retirements and new starts
  • Research-management update
  • Extensive snow survey pulse?

Monthly meetings are used to share science, news, and opportunities related to the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research program. We start with a science hour and then move into program news and announcements. Anyone is welcome to attend.  Monthly meetings are on the first Friday of the month during the academic year.



 
Andrews Forest vegetation. Photo by Lina DiGregorio. Harmon & Pabst paper on 100-year vegetation study short-listed for JVS Editors' Award

The recent Harmon & Pabst paper on "Testing predictions of forest succession using long-term measurements: 100 yrs of observations in the Oregon Cascades" was short-listed for 2015 Journal of Vegetation Science Editors' Award.

From http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jvs.12368/full#jvs12368-sec-0003:    "Harmon & Pabst (2015), which tested predictions of forest succession using 100-yr long measurements. Many common predictions about forest succession have been based on studies of forest patches of different age. Harmon & Pabst explored whether these predictions are consistent with long-term measurements in permanent plots. They used data from a coniferous forest patch where mortality and regeneration were assessed every 5–10 yr for over a century. They concluded that predictions from chronosequences at the population and community level were similar with long-term direct observations, whereas predictions at the ecosystem level were not. This outlines the importance of long-term observations in plant community ecology."

Harmon, M.E. & Pabst, R.J. 2015. Testing predictions of forest succession using long-term measurements: 100 yrs of observations in the Oregon Cascades. Journal of Vegetation Science 26: 722–732.



 
Andrews Forest fall color. photo by Lina DiGregorio Monthly Meeting: December 4, Forestry Sciences Lab Room 20

“Sediment and POC source in Western Oregon watersheds”  presented by Jeff Hatten, Assistant Professor, FERM

“Biotic and abiotic controls on long-term nitrogen balances in HJA watersheds” presented by Steve Perakis, Research Ecologist, USGS.

Andrews Forest Monthly meetings are used to share science, news, and opportunities related to the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research program. We start with a science hour and then move into program news and announcements. Anyone is welcome to attend.  Monthly meetings are held from 9-11 AM on the first Friday of the month during the academic year (upcoming: January 8, February 5, March 4, April 1, May 6, June 3) in Room 20 of the Forestry Sciences Lab, 3200 SW Jefferson Way.



 
Top of the Mind logo. Mark Harmon speaks about dead wood on BYU Radio's "Top of the Mind"

http://www.byuradio.org/episode/93bfb4f0-e76a-48bd-8411-b68fa8add2fa?playhead=1944&autoplay=true



 
leaves in Andrews stream. Photo by Gabriel Shea GEO 548 Class Presentation: Disturbance legacies across temporal and spatial scales

The Geo 548 class will be presenting their field project: Disturbance legacies across temporal and spatial scales: Investigating drivers of stream channel dynamics – Middle Lookout Creek

Date: November 18

Time: 1:00 pm

Location: WILK 207

Using field observations, LIDAR, and long-term records from the Andrews Forest, the project examines stream channel dynamics and the roles of landforms and wood in a section of Lookout Creek downstream of the concrete bridge to just downslope of the DIRT plots and the log decomposition site.  



 
Mark Harmon measuring the diameter of a tree. Photo by Lina DiGregorio The Life of a Dead Tree: Art and Science at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest

Corvallis Science Pub: November 9, 2015. 6-8 PM.

Speakers: Mark Harmon, OSU College of Forestry; Oregon artists Leah Wilson, Bob Keefer, Andries Fourier and David Paul Bayles

"Speakers at the November 9 Corvallis Science Pub will combine the science of tree decomposition with the creative vision of artists who explore the life that emerges from trees after they die. Mark Harmon, professor and holder of the Richardson Chair in Forest Science at Oregon State University, will present the results of nearly 30 years of decomposition research at the H.J. Andrews Forest in the Cascades east of Eugene.

Four artists — Leah Wilson, Bob Keefer, David Bayles and Andries Fourier — will discuss their efforts to understand the life of dead trees through the visual arts. They are all participating in a project, The Afterlife of Trees, organized by the Corvallis Arts Center in partnership with the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature and the Written Word at Oregon State. The show is scheduled to run at the Arts Center from January 15 to February 25."

See http://oregonstate.edu/terra/science-pub-corvallis/ for more information about this talk and about science pub.

See http://theartscenter.net/rot-the-afterlife-of-trees-blog/ for more information on the ROT art exhibit.

See http://theartscenter.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Update-from-the-Rotter-in-Charge-with-photos.pdf for notes from Mark Harmon on his 2015 field season.

The Science Pub presentation is free and open to the public. It begins at 6 p.m. at the Old World Deli, 341 S.W. 2nd St. in Corvallis. Sponsors of Science Pub include Terra magazine at OSU, the Downtown Corvallis Association and the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry.



 
Cynthia Sagers (center) tours the Andrews Forest. Photo by Lina DiGregorio/OSU. OSU's VP of Research tours the Andrews Forest

Cynthia Sagers, OSU's new Vice President for Research, toured the Andrews Forest on November 3, hosted by a group of researchers. The group explored the extensive research instrumentation in watershed 1, hiked along the Discovery Trail to showcase education and stream research, and visited the storied log decomposition site to discuss the value of long-term research and the emerging arts and humanities program. While this was Sagers' first visit to the Andrews Forest, she knew about the LTER program through her experience at NSF, and she knew about the Andrews Forest through colleagues who had worked at the site. Sagers noted that the Andrews Forest is a valuable university-wide resource and expressed great interest in and support of the program.



 
Andrews Forest. Photo by Thomas Iraci/USFS Monthly Meeting: November 6, Forestry Sciences Lab Room 20

Monthly meetings are used to share science, news, and opportunities related to the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research program. We start with a science hour and then move into program news and announcements. Anyone is welcome to attend.  Monthly meetings are on the first Friday of the month during the academic year.

Please mark your calendar for 9 – 11 AM, for November 6, December 4, January 8, February 5, March 4, April 1, May 6, June 3.  We will meet in Room 20 of the Forestry Sciences Lab, 3200 SW Jefferson Way.

Science Hour, November 6:

“10 years of DOC measurements at HJA: landscape, hydrologic, and management controls on DOC fluxes and chemistry,” presented by Kate Lajtha, Professor, Crop and Soil Sciences, and

"A remote view the HJA’s landscape neighborhood,”  presented by Robert Kennedy, Assistant Professor, CEOAS

For Science Hour on December 4 we will hear about:

“Sediment and POC source in Western Oregon watersheds”  presented by Jeff Hatten, Assistant Professor, FERM

“Biotic and abiotic controls on long-term nitrogen balances in HJA watersheds” presented by Steve Perakis, Research Ecologist, USGS.



 
Andrews Forest Newsletter Fall 2015 Issue

The new Fall 2015 issue of the Andrews Forest Newsletter is online at http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/newsletter.  In this issue you can:

• Read about studies that are using the summer 2015 drought conditions to study how projected changes from climate change will impact streams

• Peer through a thermal camera at the forest canopy

• Tune into the ever-growing arts and humanities program at the Forest.

The Andrews Forest Newsletter is a semi-annual publication of the Andrews Forest Program. We welcome your feedback, ideas, and comments. Contact us at andrewsnewsletter@fsl.orst.edu.

 



 
Ricardo Rozzi Seminar and Roundtable Discussion: Ricardo Rozzi

The Andrews Forest LTER program, in conjunction with the COF’s Graduate and International Programs in the College of Forestry and the OSU’s Environmental Arts and Humanities Program, is pleased to host Ricardo Rozzi, a leading thinker concerning the intersection of society and the environment, especially in forest systems. Rozzi is a Chilean ecologist and philosopher who is professor and the Director of the Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Conservation Program.  We invite you to attend the following seminar and roundtable discussion.

Seminar:  The Place of Environmental Ethics in Sites of Long-Term Ecological, Social, and Conservation Work: The Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Conservation Program.  Thursday, October 22, 11 AM. Richardson 115

Roundtable discussion: Patagonian Long-Term Socio-Ecological Research program and the integration of humanities in the Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Program and the Omora Ethnobotanical Park.  Thursday, October 22. 1 PM.  Peavy 143

Ricardo Rozzi is a Chilean ecologist and philosopher who is professor and Director of the Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Conservation Program (SBCP), coordinated by the University of North Texas in the US and by the University of Magallanes and the Millennium Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity (IEB) in Chile. His research combines ecological sciences and ethics through the study of the interrelations between the ways of knowing and inhabiting the natural world. He has developed a biocultural ethics that demands incorporating this value of the co-inhabitants subjects into development policies as a matter of socio-environmental justice. A higher recognition of the value of biocultural diversity demands an environmental justice that includes poor and marginalized people: the oppressed human beings side-by-side with the oppressed other-than-human beings.

In addition to his theoretical work, Dr. Rozzi has collaborated with the Chilean Ministry of Education, the Latin American Ecology Schoolyard Program, and has participated in the creation of the "Senda Darwin" Biological Station (Chiloé Island, Chile), the Latin American Network of Ethnobotanical Parks, and the Omora Ethnobotanical Park (Puerto Williams, Chile), with the aim of incorporating environmental ethics in the practices of conservation and education in Latin America. He also led the creation of the UNESCO Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve at the southern end of the Americas, and co-founded the Chilean Long-Term Socio-Ecological Research Network (LTSER-Chile). For his work he has received the National Prize for excellence in teaching of science  by the Chilean National Science Foundation in 2004, the BBVA Foundation Prize for Research in Conservation Biology with the Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity in 2004, the Science and the Practice of Ecology and Society Award 2008 –journal Ecology and Society in 2008, the  Sustainability Award by the House of Peace (Fundación Casa de la Paz, 2008), and the Raanan Weitz Projects' Competition Award in Israel 2010.



 
WaterViz screenshot Andrews Forest links with WaterViz

The Andrews Forest is involved in a new project to combine art, music, neuroscience in visualization and communications about long-term data streams - such as streamflow and temperature records.  The project, called WaterViz, is spearheaded by Lindsey Rustad, lead USFS scientist for Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and LTER site, and now funded with an NSF EAGER grant.  See the press release http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/news/release/NSF-WaterViz

The Waterviz program is featured on Virginia Water Radio Episode 283 (9-28-15), “Turning Water to Music through Sonification,” is now available online at http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/2015/09/turning-water-to-music-through.html.  It’s 4 minutes/8 seconds.



 
Lookout Creek Trail. Photo by Rob Mutch. Calling Current and Prospective Graduate Students! Field Trip!

October 9th, 2015:  Field trip and tour of the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research site.

Walk in 500-year old-growth forest, learn about current research, and discuss opportunities and ideas with Andrews Forest researchers, personnel, and fellow students.

We encourage students from any disciplinary background to learn more about the program and become involved in our community.

Vans will leave at 8AM from the OSU Richardson Hall parking lot and will return by 6 PM. Lunch will be provided on site. There is an option to spend the night but you must let us know in advance and make a reservation.

Contact lina.digregorio@oregonstate.edu



 
Photo by Rob Mutch Opportunity for MS Degree focusing on forest science and information management

The HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and  Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site has funding for a student to pursue a Master’s Degree focusing on Information Management in the Forest Ecosystems and Society Department, starting by Fall 2016.  The ideal student would have a mix of interests in ecology, natural resources and computer science and be interested in using tools such as MatLab, Python, R, SQL Server and other SQL solutions.  The Thesis project would involve analysis, modelling, or visualization of a long term dataset to address an ecological question. This would be an ideal opportunity for someone wanting to learn how to evaluate and manage extensive long-term, short-term, and streaming data and to work with scientists and researchers from a variety of disciplines. 

For more information, please contact Mark Schulze, Andrews Forest Director (mark.schulze@oregonstate.edu) or Sherri Johnson, USFS Team Lead, Andrews Experimental Forest (sherrijohnson@fs.fed.us).



 
Catalina Segura (right) shares a poster at the LTER All Scientists Meeting 2015 Andrews Forest LTER scientists attend the 2015 LTER All Scientists Meeting
Every three years, researchers in the NSF's Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) program gather to discuss science and share discoveries. This year, almost 600 scientists from across the LTER network attended the 2015 LTER All Scientists Meeting from August 30 through September 2 in Estes Park, Colorado. There were over 300 poster presentations and more than 75 formal and ad-hoc working group meetings. The meeting's theme was "From Long-Term Data to Understanding: Toward a Predictive Ecology." Twenty six students, faculty, and researchers from the Andrews Forest LTER Program attended the meeting. They participated in and led working groups, and they presented posters on their work with a goal of sharing ideas, networking with colleagues, and furthering the science and ideas across the LTER network.


 
Mark Harmon presents at HJA Day 2015. Photo by Rob Mutch Ecosystem Photography HJ Andrews Summer Seminar Series. Final Talk: Mark Harmon. July 29.

The final speaker in the HJ Andrews Summer Seminar Series will be Mark Harmon, an ecosystem ecologist and long-term researcher of carbon dynamics at the HJ Andrews.  Please join us at the Headquarters Conference room on Wednesday, July 29, at 7:30 PM for Mark's talk. The seminar series has provided a opportunity to learn about a wide range of research going at the Andrews Forest LTER site, through presentations from Andrews PI's discussing their work. 



 
ESIP Information Managers attend Federation of Earth Science Information Partners Meeting

Andrews LTER Information Management team members, Don Henshaw and Fox Peterson, attended the ESIP (Federation of Earth Science Information Partners) in Asilomar, CA, from July  13 –17, 2015, with a goal of presenting the EnviroSensing Cluster and developing strategies with other key LTER information managers regarding the future of data management within the LTER network.  Fox Peterson presented two selected workshops: one on "git", which is a Linux-based, open-source version control system for managing software applications, and the second on best practices in developing and archiving "code" used for data analysis in long-term research sites. Don Henshaw developed a poster outlining the Envirosensing Cluster's Best Practices for Sensor Networks (available here: http://wiki.esipfed.org/index.php/EnviroSensing_Cluster) and participated in key discussions with other IM's regarding network-wide information management plans. Fox and other ESIP sponsored "fellows" also developed proposals for several multi-site data management projects which are currently being reviewed by a selection panel.  Other workshops at the conference included the Federal Agency Repository Review, CyberInfrastructure for Physical Datasets, and Advancing the Power and Utility of Server Side Data Aggregation. The ESIP conference was sponsored by the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners, whose activities are sponsored by NASA and NOAA.



 
HJA Day 2015. Photo by Lina DiGregorio/OSU HJA Day 2015 Draws 130 to the Andrews Forest

HJA Day, the annual field day at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research site, drew in a crowd of 130. Attendees included researchers, students, forest managers, university employees, agency employees, and the general public.  Events of the day included presentations on pollinator networks, forest governance, flows of water and air, arts and humanties, and field trips on hydrology, outreach, soils, LIDAR, forest management, wood decomposition, and writing.



 
HJA Day 2014. Photo by Lina DiGregorio. HJA Day, June 25. Register by June 18!

HJA Day is the annual field day at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest Long Term Ecological Research site in Blue River, Oregon. The event features presentations and hands-on activities. Come and learn more about research, education, outreach, art and humanities, and management activities associated with the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program. Transportation is provided to and from the OSU campus. Lunch is provided to those who register by June 18.  The event is free, but registration is required. See the HJA Day website to register.



 
image from texastribune.org LTER Grad Student Recognized

Chelsea Batavia, an MS student with Michael Paul Nelson in OSU’s Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society (FES), recently received three awards:  an Oregon Lottery Graduate Scholarship, an OSU College of Forestry Doctoral Student Fellowship, and an FES MS Achievement Award. Chelsea works on ethics in forest conservation and management. She is currently finishing up with her Master's thesis on ecological forestry, a strategy of forest management rooted in science that has largely come out of the Andrews over the past several decades. Chelsea will hopefully be part of a future project probing the biophysical and human dimensions of ecological forestry treatments conducted at the Andrews, as she continues to work toward her PhD. Congratulations, Chelsea!



 
meadow at the Andrews Forest. photo by Lina DiGregorio Diversity, generalization, and specialization in plant-pollinator networks

M.S. Thesis Defense Seminar: "Diversity, generalization, and specialization in plant-pollinator networks of montane meadows, western Cascades, Oregon."  Presented by Edward Helderop, M.S., Geography. Advisor: Dr. Julia Jones.  Tuesday, June 9th, 2015, 1:00PM. Wilkinson 235.



 
DIRT plots at the Andrews Forest. Photo by Lina DiGregorio Homogenization of detrital leachate in an old-growth coniferous forest

M.S. Thesis Defense Seminar: “Homogenization of detrital leachate in an old-growth coniferous forest, OR: Dissolved organic carbon fluorescence signatures in soils undergoing long-term litter manipulations.” Presented by April Strid, M.S. Student of Kate Lajtha. Friday, June 5th, 2015, 2PM. ALS 4001.



 
Celis at Bunchgrass Meadow. photo by Chris Parson Thesis defense on meadow plant species. June 2 at 1PM -- NOTE TIME CHANGE.

"The role of intraspecific functional trait variation in the differential decline of meadow species following conifer encroachment"

Jessica Celis, MS Candidate working with Andy Jones in Botany & Plant Pathology

June 2, 2015.  1 PM,  ALS 4001



 
Wolf Rock. Photo by Lina DiGregorio Thesis defense: "Ecological Forestry: A Critical Analysis"

Chelsea Batavia, candidate for MS in Forest Ecosystems and Society, will present her thesis titled, “Ecological Forestry: A Critical Analysis.”

Thursday, June 4th, 2015. 3:15pm in Richardson 313.

 



 
Andrews Forest. photo by Lina DiGregorio. Carbon, Wood Products, and Wildlife: A framework to explore natural resource trade-offs

Tuesday, May 26. 12 - 1 PM, Richardson Hall 313

Mark Harmon, Tom Spies, and Jeff Kline

Title:  “Carbon, Wood Products, and Wildlife: A framework to explore natural resource trade-offs”

Abstract:  We developed a simulation model-based framework to explore the full suite of potential outcomes of carbon stores, wood products, and wildlife species for a diverse set of forest management systems. Potential outcomes are estimated from steady-state solutions assuming the management system is run in perpetuity. This information is used to create a framework that allows one to assess trade-offs among the response variables (e.g., western bluebird versus spotted owl) and to evaluate the trajectory of change when management systems are changed. Part of the Spring 2015 Speaker Series: “Research Across Boundaries in the College of Forestry.”



 
HJA Day 2014. photo by Lina DiGregorio Thesis defense on HJA Day Experiences

“HJA Day Experiences: Understanding Participant Outcomes at a Non-Formal Science Education Event.”

Master's degree defense by Lauren Remenick.  May 26, 2015, 2pm, in Richardson Hall 115.



 
Douglas fir branch. Photo by Lina DiGregorio Microclimate influence variation of budburst phenology within a mature Douglas-fir

Becky Miller, Bioresource Research Seminar

May 27th 9am in Richardson 107

Title: "How does microclimate influence variation of budburst phenology within a mature Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii)?"

Advisors: Dr. Heather Lintz (Oregon Climate Change Research Center); Dr. Christoph Thomas (University of Bayreuth, Germany)



 
Lookout Creek Trail. photo by Rob Mutch. Seminar: Is the intrinsic value of nature an axiom of, or anathema to, conservation?

presented by Dr. Michael P. Nelson, Ruth H. Spaniol Chair of Renewable Resources and Professor of Environmental Ethics and Philosophy, Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, Oregon State University.  This is part of the FW507 Departmental Seminar.  May 13, 4-5 PM, Nash 206. Open to the public.



 
The Stump. Artwork by Bob Keefer. Andrews Forest Inspired Art: Bob Keefer Exhibit

May 8 - June 13, 2015.  Jacobs Gallery, Eugene, Oregon.

Special slide presentation and talk by Bob will be on Thursday, May 21, 6-8PM. "Investigating the Forest: A Year of Photography at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest"

Jacobs Gallery is in the lower level of the Hult Center for the Performing Arts, 1 Eugene Center (7th & Willamette),

Eugene, Oregon 97401. Directions & Parking



 
Andrews Forest. photo by Lina DiGregorio. Removing trees for healthy forests: impacts on the American matsutake mushroom

Dan Luoma, “Removing trees for healthy forests: impacts on the American matsutake mushroom resource”

Tuesday, May 12, 12-1 PM, RH 313

Part of the Spring 2015 Speaker Series: “Research Across Boundaries in the College of Forestry”

Abstract:  The presentation will provide an overview of the interdisciplinary aspects and science findings of a study that assessed impacts of active forest management on the persistence of American matsutake shiros (mycelia colonies) in the soil. The development of this study was motivated by concerns raised by mushroom harvesters regarding forest managers’ abilities to sustain matsutake mushroom harvests over the long-term.



 
Andrews Forest. photo by Lina DiGregorio. "ROT: The Afterlife of Trees" art exhibit. Call to artists!

The Arts Center invites artists to submit artwork as a Request for Proposals to be considered for a January-February 2016 exhibit. The exhibit is a collaboration with co-sponsor Spring Creek Project and the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in the Cascade Mountains with ecologist Dr. Mark E. Harmon, the lead researcher on tree decomposition project in the H.J Andrews Forest, all associated with Oregon State University.

ROT: The Afterlife of Trees will be an exhibition of artworks showing visual interpretations of and/or reflections on decomposition, conceived from Dr. Harmon’s forest research. The exhibition will feature both invited artists and juried artists responding to this RFP, and is open to both 2D and 3D media.

Two Field Research Opportunities: Dr. Harmon will take small groups of interested artists on ½ day-long field trips to the H.J. Andrews Forest research sites in summer and fall of 2015. On the fall trip, samples will be made available for interested artists to use in their work. This material may be pieces of boles (trunks) in the form of slices or part slices, some branches, or wood chip samples that could be used to compare colors or perhaps for pigments.  Field trips are open to both invited artists and artists involved in the jury process; Preregistration is required. Space for the field trips is limited and will be allotted on a first come, first served basis.

See the Arts Center website for more detail.



 
Aspens in RMNP, 2009. Photo by Lina DiGregorio LTER All-Scientists Meeting. August 30 – September 2, 2015

The Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network holds a network-wide meeting, the “All Scientists Meeting” (ASM), every three years.  The next meeting is scheduled to be August 30 – September 2, 2015, in Estes Park, Colorado.

This is an important meeting in a beautiful location, and a great opportunity to network with other researchers and students.  One important part of this meeting is the development of working groups focused on specific topics and goals. There will also be a Graduate Student Symposium, and meetings for Information Managers and Education reps on August 30, the day before the main ASM begins.

Andrews Forest LTER researchers and students are encouraged to attend. The LTER Network Office and the Andrews Forest LTER grant will provide travel funds for up to 15 researchers and students from the Andrews Forest LTER.

ASM DEADLINES:

  • Now open - Working Group and Poster Submission 
  • Now open -  Housing and Shuttle Reservations
  • Now open - Meeting Registration opens ($50 per person)
  • June 29 - Housing Reservation Closes; Room block released
  • July 31 - Working Group Submission closes
  • July 31 – Poster Submission closes (Late posters accepted up to the poster limit of 400)
  • July 31 – Early Meeting Registration closes (registration increases to $75)


 
video frame Video: Discovery at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest
Julia Jones, a geography professor at Oregon State University, takes students out into the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon's western Cascade Range. There, students explore, discuss and discover landscapes and why they look the way they do. Published on YouTube by Abby Metzger and David Reinhardon April 28, 2015.  Watch the video online.


 
Photo:  Blue River Reservoir. photo by Lina DiGregorio Seminar: Optimizing reservoir operations to adapt to climate and social change

Ph. D. candidate seminar: “Optimizing reservoir operations to adapt to 21st century expectations of climate and social change in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon."  Presenter: Kathleen Moore, Ph.D. Candidate in Geography, Doctoral Advisors Julia Jones (Geography, CEOAS) and William Jaeger (Applied Economics). Tuesday, May 5, noon-1 p.m., OSU Campus in Kidder 202, online at http://live.oregonstate.edu



 
Pacific rhododendron. by Rob Mutch Andrews Forest LTER Monthly Meeting: May 1, 9-11 AM, Richardson Hall 313

9am - 10am - Science Hour

Robert Kennedy, CEOAS. Geospatial analysis, remote sensing, modeling, landscape ecology, disturbance dynamics, computational methods. Research Interests: Humans depend on landscapes to provide sustainable services, yet most landscapes are under increasing stress as they respond to both natural and anthropogenic processes of change.  Using satellite-based remote sensing as my primary tool, my goal is to develop new conceptual and analytical approaches to directly observe landscape change processes and relate those changes to driving forces.

Catalina Segura, Forest Hydrologist, COF FERM. Title: Scaling properties of the rainfall runoff generation processes in the H.J. Andrews. Abstract: Preliminary results from an ongoing investigation of storm response in the HJA forest will be presented.  The overall objective of this investigation is to generate relations that describe the spatial-temporal variability of rainfall-runoff generation in mountainous streams and to investigate their relationship to nutrient delivery from hillslopes to streams.  We have collected information from 3 storms at 4 locations and anticipate characterizing 5-10 more catchment-storm pairs over the next year.

10am - General meeting and discussion

WORKING GROUP and POSTER Submissions for the 2015 LTER All Scientists Meeting are NOW OPEN!  The triennial All Scientists Meeting (Aug 30-Sept 3, 2015) provides an opportunity for LTER researchers to meet and interchange ideas. An important part of this meeting is the development of working groups focused on information exchange, scientific interactions and planning for future research. Anyone associated with the LTER Network and its extended collaborators may propose a working group. Working Group Requests will be accepted until the Final Deadline of July 31, 2015.  Please see the ASM 2015 Meeting website for more information:  http://asm2015.lternet.edu. If you plan to submit a working group proposal, please let Michael Nelson know – we’re not organizing or regulating these efforts, just want to be kept in the loop.

Please mark your calendars for the next big event in the forest - HJA Day, Thursday, June 25, 2015

And all those new to field work at the Andrews are strongly encouraged to attend HJA Safety Day, Thursday, June 18, 2015



 
Andrews Forest Newsletter Spring 2015 Andrews Forest Newsletter Spring 2015 Issue now online

The Spring 2015 issue of the Andrews Forest Newsletter has just been published. We invite you to explore the newsletter to learn about the people and the projects that make the Andrews Forest special. Check out the current issue and past issues online at http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/newsletter

  • Find out what we’re learning from century-long studies of forested plots in the Pacific Northwest. 
  • Learn how maps and new technologies are being used to assess spotted owl habitat.
  • Meet our current graduate student representatives and find out about their research.
  • Track plants and the seasons with a new citizen science project.


 
Moss at the Andrews Forest. Photo by Lina DiGregorio Andrews Forest LTER Monthly Meeting: April 3, 9-11 AM, Richardson Hall 313
9am - 10am: Science Hour

First talk: Dave Bell, Research Forester, USFS

Title: Examining the structural legacy of a 1960s timber harvest at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest.

Abstract: Disturbance plays a dominant role in defining vegetation structure in forested landscapes, most obviously in resetting the successional clock. However, the consequences of those disturbances may not be spatially homogenous or restricted to the disturbed patch itself. To explore the diverse impacts of disturbance on a forested landscape, we examine forest structure in and around a 96-ha area clearcut in 1960: Watershed 1 at the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest. We use both vegetation plot data and remotely sensed data (Landsat and Lidar) to tease apart variation in forest structure both within the harvested area and in a neighboring old-growth stand. This research provides an example of how diverse data sets might be leveraged to study the consequences of past disturbance.

Second talk: Thomas Hilker, OSU College of Forestry, Department of Forest Engineering and Resource Management

Abstract: Earth system science is at the crossroads as it is faced with the daunting task of assessing the risks of anthropogenic change to earth and atmosphere, its feedback on global ecosystems and ultimately, its consequences for live on earth. To meet these challenges, comprehensive information on ecosystem health, structure and landscape composition is needed, as well as practitioners, managers and policy makers to help implement mitigation strategies. Remote sensing of vegetation structure and function can provide critical information for monitoring the “states” and “fates” of terrestrial ecosystems, thereby helping to not only “paint the bigger picture” of global change but also to improve our understanding of ecosystem behavior. This presentation will provide a number of case studies on how remotely sensed information may be used to inform models of ecosystem function across a broad range of scales.

10am - General meeting and discussion

Mini-Presentations on upcoming LTER7 work of interest to many groups:

- Mark Harmon – A new Andrews forest soils effort

- Steve Wondzell – The Soil/Water/Veg work proposed in LTER7



 
Andrews Forest. Photo by Lina DiGregorio Thesis defense: foliage temperatures and air flow dynamics

"Bright Air: Geoprocessing Thermal Imagery to Map the Dynamics of the Nocturnal, Weak-Wind Boundary Layer in a Mountain Valley", MS Thesis Defense by Chris Johnson, Ocean, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences (Atmospheric Sciences concentration)

Advisor: Dr. Christoph Thomas

Thursday, March 12, 2015. 9AM. Burt Hall 193

A thermal infrared (TIR) camera is used to remotely sense the foliage temperature in a mountain valley. The foliage temperature is used as a proxy for air temperature and can be used to study and map the dynamics of the nocturnal, weak-wind boundary layer in this valley.  All radiative flux not originating from the forest canopy must be filtered out of the captured imagery. Once the image has been filtered it must be georeferenced and orthorectified before useful analyses can be performed.  After geoprocessing is complete, a georeferenced time series of temperatures for an entire forested mountain valley will be available for further exploitation.  The geoprocessed thermal imagery can, when combined with various data recorded in situ, yield data sets such as sensible heat flux at the canopy surface, potential temperature profiles, the adiabatic lapse rate in the watershed, the state of static stability in the watershed, and to map cold-air pool dynamics.  Evidence was established that two hypotheses underlying the Bright Air study can be demonstrated to be valid.  The first is that a TIR camera can accurately record foliage canopy temperature.  The second is that on clear nights, foliage canopy temperature can be a proxy for the temperature of air immediately adjacent to the canopy.  This study indicates that a TIR camera can accurately measure foliage canopy temperature on clear nights.  Furthermore, the study indicates that on clear or intermittently cloudy nights, foliage canopy temperatures as measured by a TIR camera can be a proxy for the temperature of air immediately adjacent to the canopy.  A process to georeference and orthorectify thermal imagery was selected and a tool to geoprocess the thermal imagery was created.  The selected thermal imagery geoprocessing workflow produced results with a root mean square spatial error of 29 meters.  The error calculated for the results provides a level of certainty that spatial inaccuracies will have a very small effect on any temperature related calculations based on the geoprocessed data set.  Vertical profiles of potential temperature in the study area were created for times of interest and classified according to flow regimes.  Dominant flow regimes were found to correlate well with earlier studies.  Cold-air pool formation and drainage evolution were characterized for several clear nights.  Nocturnal cold-air dynamics in the study area do not agree with common explanations of behavior of cold-air pools and drainage in mountain valleys.  Up-valley flow patterns in the watershed indicate that nocturnal flows in mountain valleys are not driven solely by gravity.  For the nights studied, flows in the watershed interact with flows from other connected basins and have identifiable patterns and physical modes.



 
Think Out Loud Nature's Intrinsic Value

Michael Paul Nelson, Lead PI for the Andrews Forest LTER Program, was a guest on Oregon Public Broadcasting's  "Think Out Loud" on Friday, February 27, noon - 1 PM, pacific time.  Nelson spoke about the intrinsic value of nature. Nelson and colleagues recently published an article titled, "Evaluating whether nature's intrinsic value is an axiom or or anathema to conservation",  which appeared in the journal, Conservation Biology, in March 2015.  View the OSU press relase for more detail.



 
Ellie's Log cover Ellie's Log and the Language of Science, March 7 event

OSU Extension Service, Benton County, 4-H Wildlife Stewards Educator Workshop:  "Ellie's Log and the Language of Science, Field Journals and Science Notebooks."  Saturday, March 7, 9AM - 3 PM, Beazell Education Center, Kings Valley HWY, Philomath, Oregon.

  • Connect students to our local forests
  • Conect with science in the outdoors
  • Connect with hands-on activities

Who should attend: teachers, non-formal educators, 4-H and scout leaders, and others who work iwth youth in outdoor settings. Register online. $25 fee includes lunch and supplies.

Additional information: contact jody.einerson@oregonstate.edu

Ellie's Log is a children's book based on research done at the Andrews Forest.



 
NW Climate Science Logo Andrews Forest LTER Monthly Meeting: March 6, 9-11 AM, Richardson Hall 313

Science Hour will feature two presentations:

Cliffs Notes on The Northwest Climate Science Center. Presented by Gustavo A. Bisbal, Director, DOI NW Climate Science Center.

The Northwest Climate Science Center (NW CSC) is a regional partnership that coordinates the expertise of federal and university professionals to advance climate science development and delivery.  It is one of eight such Centers launched by the Department of the Interior to understand and address changes in climate and their effects on natural systems and issues of significance to society.  The NW CSC emphasizes five core services (science, education and training, data management, communication, and executive) as central strategic elements to address current and future impacts of climate change. Two websites: http://www.doi.gov/csc/northwest/index.cfm and https://www.nwclimatescience.org/

Modeling the effect of forest change on snowmelt timing across the PNW. Presented by Susan Dickerson-Lange, PhD student, University of Washgington.

Both climate and forest characteristics influence the seasonal timing of snowmelt in the mountain watersheds of the Pacific Northwest.  With snowmelt projected to occur earlier in the year due to climate change, we assess the role of forest change via management or disturbance to amplify or diminish the impact of warming temperatures on snowmelt and streamflow timing.  In particular, we combine regional plot-scale observations and citizen science with an empirical framework to characterize the spatial patterns of forest influence on snow processes.  We will present our preliminary results, which illustrate that to optimize retaining snow cover on the landscape, managers in some areas would need to prevent catastrophic fires to retain forest cover while those in other areas would want to strategically open gaps in the canopy. http://depts.washington.edu/mtnhydr/research/PNWsnowforest.shtml

10 AM: General meeting and discussion, including two site use proposals.



 
stream sampling at the Andrews Forest. photo by Lina DiGregorio Presentation: Linking aquatic consumers to stream function

A seminar about a stream experiment at Andrews Forest will be presented at the Stream Team Monday Morning Meeting on March 2, 10am in Nash room 32. All are welcome to attend.

Drs. Alba Argerich and Brooke Penaluna will present:  Linking aquatic consumers to stream function: A field experiment at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest. 

Brief Synopsis: At HJ Andrews during summer of 2014, they began assessing the effects of stream consumers, including Cutthroat Trout and Coastal Giant Salamander, on primary production, ecosystem respiration and nutrient cycling in Lower McRae Creek. This research is part of a cross-LTER project, termed SCALER, which is designed to understand structure and function of aquatic systems (see http://www.k-state.edu/ecoforecasting/SCALER/index.html for details). Other SCALER sites include study of streams in tropical forest (Luquillo LTER), temperate deciduous forest (Coweeta LTER), prairie (Konza LTER), northern boreal evergreen forest (Bonanza Creek LTER), tundra (Artic LTER) areas and savanna (Darwin, Australia).  During summer 2015, this research will expand to 3 sites at the Andrews.



 
Undergraduate field workers at the Andrews Forest. photo by Lina DiGregorio/OSU Summer jobs at the Andrews Forest

Check out the job opportunities page for summer field work and internship opportunities at the Andrews Forest.  These positions are an exciting way to get involved with research in a fantastic setting.



 
Andrews Forest stream. Photo by Lina DiGregorio. Andrews Forest featured in OSU's research "Terra" blog

Research at the Andrews Forest was featured in OSU's research magazine, Terra.  Read the full story online:

http://oregonstate.edu/terra/2015/01/seeking-the-secrets-of-old-growth/

 



 
fill slope failure at mile post 4 on the 1506 road. Photo by Mark Schulze ALERT! Road failure at mile post 4 on the 1506 road

A fill slope failure at mile post 4 on the 1506 road (just southwest of the McRae Creek Bridge) removed ½ of the road width along a 50 foot section.  USFS geologists and engineers have identified a solution to stabilize the road and improve drainage in this area, and will implement the fix in the near future.  Until then, please exercise extreme caution if attempting to cross this area.  Inspect the road bed for signs of new cracks before attempting to cross.  Due to mud and clearance issues, do not attempt crossing this area in a sedan or other vehicle designed for paved roads.  After a period of very heavy rain, or if you see significant water pooling in the ditch line or flowing out of the slope failure zone, carefully weigh the urgency of your need to cross this zone against other priorities you and your family may have for your life.



 
soil sieve used at the Andrews Forest. Photo by Lina DiGregorio. Andrews Forest LTER Monthly Meeting: February 6, 9-11 AM, Richardson Hall 313

9 AM: Science Hour

Title: Beneath the trees: soils of the HJ Andrews Forest.  Presented by Karen Bennett, Regional Soil Scientist, US Forest Service and Jason Martin, Soil Survey Project Leader, NRC

Title: Northwest Oregon Ecology Group: Applying science for managing forest ecosystems.  Presented by Steven A. Acker and Jane Kertis, Zone Ecologists, US Forest Service, Willamette and Siuslaw National Forest

10 AM: General meeting and discussion

Site use proposal:"From Roots to Rock – Linking Evapotranspiration and Groundwater Fluxes in the Critical Zone"



 
Andrews Forest Symposium poster session, 2009. Photo by Lina DiGregorio. Andrews Forest LTER Symposium: January 29, 2015

Please join us for presentations, posters, and lunch, and learn more about the research of the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) program. Topics will include forest ecology, climate and microclimate, birds, streams, and social science.

Morning Talks:  9 AM - Noon.  Memorial Union MULTIPURPOSE Room (note room change!)

Poster Session:  Noon - 2:30 PM.  MU Horizon Room.

Posters about research and education related to the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest and LTER program are invited and encouraged. Submit poster titles on the registration page by January 22, 2015.

Registration is free but required.

Visit the symposium webpage for more information and a registration link.

All activities will be held in the Memorial Union (MU) on the Oregon State University campus.



 
Stream in snow at the Andrews Forest. Photo by Lina DiGregorio. Andrews Forest LTER Monthly Meeting: January 9, 9-11 AM, Richardson Hall 313

9 AM: Science Hour

Title: Interactions of Pacific Northwest Snow, Forests, and Disturbance in a Changing Climate.  Presented by  Dr. Anne Nolin, Professor, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, OSU.

10 AM: General meeting and discussion

- Announcements

- Site use proposal: Aquatic Carbon study in WS 1 (continued from last month) - Steve Wondzell and Roy Haggerty.



 
2014 LTER ASM, Photo from LNO. LTER All Scientists Meeting Announced

The 2015 Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) All Scientists Meeting (ASM) will take place at the YMCA of The Rockies in Estes Park, Colorado, from August 30 through September 2, 2015. The 2015 ASM activities will be focused around the meeting theme “From Long-Term Data to Understanding: Toward a Predictive Ecology”. Working groups and poster presentations will be organized around sub-themes selected by the Program Committee, including: 1) The unique value of long-term, networked studies, 2) Crafting conceptual models that are sustainable, 3) Does continuous ecosystem stress lead to vulnerability? 4) Predicting ecological change: LTER in the era of big science, 5) LTER and society: broader impacts of long-term research, and 6) Long-term changes in Net Primary Productivity across ecosystems.

More information regarding the meeting, including the agenda, is available on the ASM website, http://asm2015.lternet.edu/.



 
Hermit Warbler. photo by Adam Hadley Dissertation Defense on Avian Occupancy Dynamics and Population Trends

Title: Effects of Spatial Scale and Heterogeneity on Avian Occupancy Dynamics and Population Trends in Forested Mountain Landscapes

Student: Sarah J. K. Frey

Major advisor: Dr. Matthew Betts

Date: Dec 9, 2014

Time: 12pm (noon)

Place: Richardson Hall 313



 
Andrews Forest LIDAR image Andrews Forest LTER Monthly Meeting: December 5, 9-11 AM, Richardson Hall 313

Please join us for two presentations:

Snow studies as a resource for observing climate change at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest – First step is evaluating the data. Presented by Burke Greer and Dr. Chris Still, Dept of Forest Ecosystems and Society, COF, OSU.

LiDAR and forest biomass at the Andrews Experimental Forest---major results and emerging new questions. Presented by Drs. Tom Spies and David Bell, Pacific Northwest Research Station, US Forest Service

Dicussion and announcements will follow.



 
Andrews Forest scene. Photo by Lina DiGregorio Contemporary forest dynamics in the Pacific Northwest

Dissertation Defense:  Matthew Reilly, Contemporary forest dynamics in the Pacific Northwest.

Tuesday December 2nd, 2:15 pm, Richardson 107

Major professor: Tom Spies

Matthew's research deals with forest mortality rates, which are a big focus of the long-term vegetation work at the Andrews Forest LTER, and it includes forest regions in which the Andrews Forest is located.



 
Andrews Forest Newsletter Fall 2014 cover Andrews Forest Newsletter Fall 2014 Issue now online

The Fall 2014 issue of the Andrews Forest Newsletter is online at http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/newsletter

In this issue:

  • Get a snapshot of the upcoming research funded by our recent “LTER7” grant: our seventh Long-Term Ecological Research grant from the National Science Foundation. 
  • See some of the faces of our undergraduate researchers.
  • Find out more about two recent grants funding work in carbon dynamics in headwater streams, and in automated interpretation of bird song.
  • Track the progress of the old and new Andrews Forest archiving project.
  • Enjoy new perspectives on the landscape through the lenses of three photographers.

The Andrews Forest Newsletter is a semi-annual publication of the Andrews Forest Program.



 
decomposing wood at the Andrews Forest. photo by Lina DiGregorio Thesis Defense on "Decomposition Pathways". Nov 20.

Samantha Colby will be defending her master's thesis on November 20th, at 2pm in LPSC 402, on the OSU campus. 

Title:  "Seasonality as a driving factor of decomposition pathways in both meadows and forests: an exploration across a gradient of climate in Oregon." Some of Samantha's research was conducted at the Andrews Forest.



 
GEO 548 class at the Andrews Forest, Fall 2014 GEO 548 Presentation on wood jam on Lookout Creek

The GEO 548 class will be presenting the results of their examination of the wood jam at the Lookout Creek old growth trail bridge crossing.

November 12, 1-2 PM, Wilkinson 207.

All are welcome.



 
McRae Creek at the Andrews Forest. photo by Lina DiGregorio Andrews Forest LTER Monthly Meeting: November 7, 9-11 AM, Richardson Hall 313

Two talks in one Science Hour

First Talk: Long-term population dynamics of aquatic vertebrates at Mack Creek in the Andrews Experimental Forest---major results and emerging new questions.

Presented by Dr. Stan Gregory, Emeritus Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University

Second Talk: Testing Hypotheses for Forest Succession using Long-term Data.

Presented by Dr. Mark Harmon, Professor, Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, Oregon State University

Discussion and other items

  • Big Leaf Maple Contest- judged by Kathy Keable.  Bring the biggest leaf and win a prize!
  • Updates from Willamette National Forest – Cheryl Friesen
  • Overview of continuing research and new studies in LTER 7 – Dr. Michael Nelson
  • And then carrot cake! Come celebrate with us!

 



 
fall color in Mahonia aquifolium. by Lina DiGregorio Andrews Forest LTER Monthly Meeting: October 3, 9-11 AM, Richardson Hall 313

Science Hour Presentation: A decade of stream invertebrate research by citizen-scientists at the Andrews Forest.  Presenter: Dr. Pat Edwards, Portland State University, and Cascades to Coast GK-12 Project Coordinator, Environmental Science and Management.

LTER Meetings are held the first Friday of the month. Each meeting will have Science Hour, focusing on research related to the LTER grant or to H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, followed by discussion and updates. All are welcome.

Meetings are held in Richardson Hall 313 on the OSU Campus. We encourage folks to use the time after the LTER Meeting for scheduling collaborations with other Andrews researchers. Richardson Hall 313 is available after the LTER Meeting until noon for small group meetings.



 
Michael Lannoo, IU Power Places and What They Can Mean to a Field Biologist

Special Seminar: Thursday, October  2, 10 AM. Richardson Hall 313

A consideration of Mann Gulch, Leopold's Shack, Ricketts's Lab, Scott's Hut, and the Iowa Lakeside Lab, where the speaker teaches and conducts field studies.


Michael J. Lannoo, Professor, Indiana University School of Medicine, is author of Malformed Frogs: The Collapse of Aquatic Ecosystems, Leopold’s Shack and Ricketts’s Lab: The Emergence of Environmentalism, and The Iowa Lakeside Laboratory: A Century of Discovering the Nature of Nature; and editor of Amphibian Declines: The Conservation Status of United States Species, among other books.


Sponsors: Andrews Forest Long-Term Ecological Research Program; Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word; Environmental Arts and Humanities Program.



 
John Vucetich 2014 Laws of nature, historical contingency, and the wolves and moose of Isle Royale

Dr. John A. Vucetich

Associate Professor of Animal Ecology

Co-Director of the Isle Royale Wolf-Moose Project

Michigan Technological University

Monday, September 29, 2014 - 4 PM, 107 Richardson Hall

John Vucetich is an Associate Professor of animal ecology, co-director of the Isle Royale Wolf-Moose Project, co-director of the Conservation Ethics Group, and author of more than 75 publications on a range of environmental topics including wolves living in places like Isle Royale, Yellowstone, Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, the desert southwest, Canada, and Scandinavia.

Click here for more information.



 
Nick Dosch at McRae Creek at the Andrews Forest, 2011 Spatiotemporal dynamics and drivers of stream CO2 in a headwater catchment
Nick Dosch will present his MS research on “Spatiotemporal dynamics and drivers of stream CO2 in a headwater catchment in the Western Cascades, Oregon" on Friday, September 12, 2014, 9AM, in Wilkinson 203. Nick is a candidate for MS in the Water Resources Engineering program and is a student in Roy Haggerty’s group in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences.


 
Hayley Corson-Rickert in Watershed 01 at the Andrews Forest Carbon dynamics in the hyporheic zone of a headwater mountain stream

Hayley Corson-Rikert will present her WRS MS research and thesis defense on September 5th at 11 am in Wilkinson, Room 203. Her presentation is entitled: “Carbon dynamics in the hyporheic zone of a headwater mountain stream in the Cascade Mountains, Oregon.”  Hayley is co-advised by Dr. Mary Santelmann, the Water Resources Graduate Program Director and Dr. Steven Wondzell from the US Forest Service.



 
Sadao Takaoka's mapping of the Andrews Forest in August 2014 Geomorphic History – Landforms and Surficial Deposits of the Andrews Forest

Informal Presentation and Discussion. Tuesday, August 26, 1 PM, Richardson Hall 313.  Sadao Takaoka and Fred Swanson.

Sadao Takaoka, Professor of Geography at Senshu University near Tokyo, has been working at Andrews Forest for several years using field studies and LIDAR data to interpret landforms, deposits, and landscape history of the Lookout Creek watershed.  This work is resulting in a great improvement of our understanding of landscape history relative to that published by Swanson and James in the mid-1970s based on ground-pounding, air photo interpretation, and USGS 15-minute topo maps.  This new work may influence how we think about aspects of 1. Ground- and surface-water conditions (including discharge and temperature), 2. Sediment production and routing, 3. Vegetation (both disturbance and habitat considerations) across the Andrews Forest landscape.

Sadao is about to head home to Japan after several weeks of field work at Andrews and we would like to share our current thinking and get reactions via an informal seminar.



 
HJA Day 2014.  Photo by Lina DiGregorio HJA Day 2014

HJA Day, the annual field gathering and information sharing at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site, was held on June 26. One hundred thirty participants participated in hands-on activities, presentations, and discussions that explored past and present research at the forest. Participants learned about hummingbird movements across the landscape, watched a fog release, stepped into a soil pit, cored trees, traced long-term records, immersed themselves in history, viewed artwork inspired by the forest, or got their hands wet in a stream.  Photos of the day’s activities are online at http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/lter/data/cd_pics/cd_photos.cfm?cd=acq&topnav=217

Thanks to all who partcipated!



 
Andrews Forest Newsletter Spring 2014 Issue Andrews Forest Newsletter Spring 2014 Issue now online

We invite you to explore the newsletter to learn about the people and the projects that make the Andrews Forest special.  andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/lter/pubs/newsletter.cfm

•  Discover how our long-term records are being used to tell stories across wide expanses of geography

•  Find out how a graduate student is employing remote sensing technologies to detect spring green-up at a landscape scale

•  Learn more about challenges around managing for the northern spotted owl

•  Link to the new OspreyCam to watch an active osprey nest at the Andrews Forest

•  Register for HJA Day, our annual field gathering at the Andrews Forest, June 26



 
Meadow at the Andrews Forest. by Lina DiGregorio Seminar: meadow species and conifer encroachment

MS Proposal:  Survival and flowering of meadow species in the face of conifer encroachment: A functional-trait approach. Presented by 

Jessica Celis, Graduate Student of Dr. Andy Jones, BPP/FES. Thursday, June 5th, 4:00pm, ALS 4001



 
Graduate Student Hayley Corson-Rikert. Andrews Forest LTER Monthly Meeting, June 6, 9-11 AM, RH 313

Presentations:

Bridging science and management: the role of a science liaison.  Presented by Cheryl Friesen, Science Liaison, Willamette National Forest.

Dynamics of stream and hyporheic pCO2 in an a forested catchment in Western Oregon, USA. Presented by Nicholas Dosch, MS student with Roy Haggerty, Water Resources Engineering.

Carbon Dynamics in the Hyporheic Zone of a Headwater Mountain Stream in the Cascade Mountains, Oregon. Presented by Hayley Corson-Rikert. MS student with Steve Wondzell and Mary Santelmann, Water Resources Science

OSU Campus, Richardson Hall 313



 
Lookout Creek, Andrews Forest. by Lina DiGregorio Spatial and Temporal Effects of Atmospheric Deposition

PhD Defense: Todd McDonnell, Forest Ecosystems and Society, “Spatial and Temporal Effects of Atmospheric Deposition, Climate, and Land Management on Forest Nutrient Cycling and Biodiversity”. Tuesday, June 3, 1 – 2pm, ALS 4000. Major professor: Kate Lajtha



 
wildflower at the Andrews Forest. by Lina DiGregorio Oregon Wildflowers app by the Oregon Flora Project

The Oregon Flora Project, together with High Country Apps, has released its Oregon Wildflowers app. This app  is an interactive field guide to 947 species of wildflowers, vines and shrubs that occur in nature in Oregon (whether they are native or introduced). It provides photos, range maps and brief descriptions for each species in addition to providing an easy-to-use interface for identification using just a few basic plant characters. 

The Oregon Wildflowers app is the latest effort of the Oregon Flora Project to meaningfully share scientific information with a broad audience. It is a great introductory tool for those curious about their natural surroundings, and it is a valuable addition to the botanist's and scientist's arsenal of plant references. In addition to the ability to key plants by selecting multiple search characters, one can filter for all plants within each plant family that is represented. There is also extensive information about Oregon ecoregions and habitats. Because it covers plants throughout the state, it can be used anywhere in Oregon.

It works without an Internet connection once downloaded, so it can be used in the remotest areas of the state. The app covers plants found throughout Oregon, and has over 3,200 photographs.

Oregon Wildflowers is compatible with iOS and Android  devices and is available through the online app stores:

Apple (https://itunes.apple.com/app/id828499164&mt=8)

Google App (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.emountainworks.android.oregonfieldguide)



 
Andrews Forest understory. by Lina DiGregorio New Course! Forest Ethics and Place relationships.

Forest Ethics and Place relationships: An H.J. Andrews Forest Experience, FES 499 and FES 599

This 6-credit field and OSU on-campus blended course will be a rigorous and embedded introduction to environmental ethics, place-based ecology, human dimensions of natural resources, and nature writing. We will engage the natural history, social context, and ecological research of the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest while developing our own relationships to place through exploration, reflection, and writing. Final projects are flexible and should reflect student majors and curiosity. Come play in the forest and learn about the intersection of science, ethics, and human/nature relationships! Two-week reading period (8/18-9/2), 5 days on campus (9/2-9/6), 1-week camping in the H.J Andrews Experimental Forest (9/8-9/15), and 1-week final project work (due 9/22). Please contact Dr. Lissy Goralnik with any questions or to see a syllabus: lissy.goralnik@oregonstate.edu.



 
snow and stream at the Andrews Forest. by Lina DiGregorio PhD defense: deposition of organic pollutants by snow

Local scale spatial and temporal variation in wet deposition of persistent organic pollutants by snow

Christopher Walsh, PhD Defense - Chemistry

Friday, May 23, 2014.

10am Linus Pauling Science Center (LPSC) 402



 
DJSpookyFlier DJ Spooky: Friday, May 9, 7:30 pm

DJ Spooky:That Subliminal Kid, in concert with Dana Reason and Michael Gamble.Friday, May 9, 7:30 pm

LaSells Stewart Center, C&E Auditorium

Composer, multimedia artist and author Paul D. Miller, a.k.a. DJ Spooky, is known for his genre-bending art, vast catalogue of music and work in social justice. In addition to collaborating with musicians, such as Chuck D, Thurston Moore and Yoko Ono, Miller has traveled the world to perform solo, as well as with chamber groups and orchestras. He was the first artist-in-residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, and his work has appeared in the The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, The Venice Biennial for Architecture and other museums. Miller is currently the executive editor of Origin Magazine, which focuses on the intersection of art, yoga and new ideas. He is the author of Book of Ice, a multimedia, multidisciplinary study of Antarctica that contemplates climate change and humanity’s relationship with the natural world. Free and open to all. http://djspooky.com/

In advance of his Corvallis appearance, Miller will be writer-in-residence for the Long-Term Ecological Reflections program at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, which is co-sponsored by the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word and the U.S. Forest Service.  

FMI: 541-737-6198; http://springcreek.oregonstate.edu/



 
Climate Seminar by Elizabeth Garcia, PhD student, UC Santa Barbara - May 1, 2-3p RH 107

 Seminar: “Climate regime and soil storage capacity interact to affect forest evapotranspiration in three western U.S. watersheds” presented by Elizabeth Garcia, PhD student, UC Santa Barbara.

Thursday, May 1, 2-3 PM, Richardson Hall 107

In forests of the western United States, total annual evapotranspiration (ET) primarily depends on annual precipitation, its seasonal distribution and soil characteristics such as soil moisture storage and drainage. Understanding how these controls influence ET in Mediterranean mountain environments is complicated by shifts between water and energy limitations both within the year and between years. Warmer temperatures in the western US have also affected seasonal water availability and growing season dynamics and the effect of these changes on ET remains uncertain. In this work, we use a physically based process model to evaluate the strength of climate controls and soil properties on ET in three western U.S. mountain catchments: the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest LTER, Oregon; Big Thompson, Colorado; and Sagehen Creek, California. Unsurprisingly, annual precipitation is a primary control of ET across all catchments though secondary climate controls vary. In all catchments, soil water holding capacity influences the sensitivity of annual ET to climatic drivers. Estimates of annual ET become more sensitive to climatic drivers at low soil water holding capacities in those catchments with the stronger decoupling between precipitation and growing season water demands.

 



 
Salal at the Andrews Forest. Photo by Lina DiGregorio. Next Monthly Meeting: May 2, 9-11AM RH 313

The next monthly meeting for the Andrews Forest program will be Friday, May 2, 9-11 AM



 
Hakai Beach Institute: A New Long-Term Ecological Research Program, Linking Terrestrial, Freshwater, Marine, and Human Systems Hakai Beach Institute: A New Long-Term Ecological Research Program

SPECIAL LECTURE: Friday, April 25, 2014 at 10am. College of Forestry. Richardson Hall 313 by Eric Peterson, Founder and President, Hakai Beach Institute, Coastal British Columbia. Introduction to the Hakai Beach Institute: A New Long-Term Ecological Research Program in Coastal British Columbia Linking Terrestrial, Freshwater, Marine, and Human Systems Eric Peterson will describe how the unlikely combination of privatized entrepreneurial science, long-term ecological research, academic partnerships, and engagement with First Nations communities has stirred a hive of activity at the Hakai Beach Institute research station-a 'Coastal Village Dedicated to Science'-on the BC coast halfway between Seattle and Ketchikan. Eric trained in genetics and neurobiology, was on faculty at McGill University in Montreal in the 1980s, became a tech entrepreneur in Waterloo, Ontario in the 1990s, and since 2001 has the directed the Tula Foundation and its Hakai Program. Among other topics, he will talk about the interplay among terrestrial and marine ecology, geology, and archaeology on this dynamic coastline. For more information see: http://hakai.org/ . Local contact: fred.swanson@oregonstate.edu



 
Paige Fischer Starker Lecture: Paige Fischer, Research Social Scientist, April 24, 3:30 pm, RH 107

Starker Lecture Series “Beyond Boundaries: Social Challenges and Opportunities in the Forest Landscape Management.” Paige Fischer, Research Social Scientist, USDA Forest Service, Western Wild land Environmental Threat Assessment center and PNW Research Station, Prineville

Thursday, April 24, 3:30 pm, RH 107

Reception to follow.

For more on the Starker Lecture Series visit http://starkerlectures.forestry.oregonstate.edu/ 



 
Beetle Drawing I                                                                                                                                      Leah Wilson art from Andrews exhibited at The Art Center, Corvallis - opening April 17
Structure of Nature: Carol Chapel and Leah Wilson will be on display at The Corvallis Art Center from April 17 through May 24. The gallery will be open from 12 - 5pm daily. For more information on the show visit: http://theartscenter.net/exhibit/structure-of-nature-carol-chapel-and-leah-wilson/

Leah Wilson will have some of her pieces from the Andrews on display for the art show. Leah Wilson’s paintings are created in the intersections of science, philosophy and art. Working with a desire to better understand the color patterns that compose the landscape, her paintings are a way to bear witness to change.

Art caption:

Bark beetle galleries on the side of a log in Lookout Creek at the Andrews Forest inspired this painting by Eugene artist Leah Wilson during her 2012 Artist-in-Residence visit. Gouache on paper.  For more of Leah’s work see: http://leahwilson.com



 
Data download access change

Downloading data from the Andrews LTER website just got a lot simplier.  There is no longer a need to register on the website and remember a password.  In order for us to produce some simple statistics about who is using our data and why, we do request that you provide your name, an email, select both an affiliation and proposed use from provided drop-down menus, and agree to our data access policy.  There is a checkbox provided that allows a cookie on your computer to remember the requested information entered above, so that next time you are logged in from that computer, you will just need to click NEXT.

Please check out our new system for downloading data and do let us know (hja_admin@fsl.orst.edu) if you experience any issues.



 
Andrews Forest Monthly Meeting Friday, March 7, 9 -11 AM

This month only we will be meeting in Forestry Sciences Laboratory (FSL), Room 20.

 

Science Hour Presentation: "How exactly do trees grow?"

Mark Harmon, Professor and Richardson Chair,  Dept of Forest Ecosystems and Society, OSU, was scheduled to talk last month about his high profile, collaborative research exploring carbon allocation in trees, but with the February snowstorm and campus being closed, we postponed it to this month.


Site Use Proposals:

- Single and combined effects of forest harvest and climate change on cutthroat trout, Brooke Penaluna, USFS PNW

- Transplanting to explore geographic range limits of Mimulus cardinalis, the scarlet monkeyflower, Matthew Bayly


Update:  LTER 7 Proposal final stages

Michael Nelson, Lead PI Andrews LTER, OSU, will share a brief overview of the major ideas and the 3 goals in the LTER 7 proposal. Proposal will be submitted to NSF March 14.


And if we have time, an update on archiving experimental data across sites, LINX project

Linda Ashkenas, Dept of Fisheries and Wildlife, OSU, will briefly highlight challenges and successes in data archiving for the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen Experiment II, a cross-site isotope study.



General Announcements

•        If you are planning research projects at the Andrews, please contact Mark Schulze (mark.schulze@oregonstate.edu).

•      Acknowledgements for use of  Andrews Forest data and/or facilities in publications: http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/lter/acknowledgements.cfm.        

        Please send citation or a copy of your new publications to: HJApubs@fsl.orst.edu 


 Site Updates

•             Winter hours at the front office are 9-4 M-Th.  Please contact Andrews staff ahead of time if you need attention outside of those office hours.  

•             Andrews Forest Facilities. Please fill out a reservation request as soon as you know your research schedule:  http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/lter/about/facility/reservation.cfm?topnav=224

 



 
Starker Lecture Series- Working Forests across the Landscape

Thursday, February 27, 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Tom Spies, Research Forester, USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station, Corvallis.

In 1792 Captain George Vancouver described the coastal forests of Oregon as a “luxuriant landscape”. This talk will explore how these forests have changed over the last 200 years, what we know about their current ecological patterns and processes, and how they might be changing in the future. It will address the ecological implications of Oregon’s forest landscape ownership and management patterns. The presentation will be based on research from the Pacific Northwest and other forested regions of the world.

For more information on this lecture, and the Starker Lecture Series: http://starkerlectures.forestry.oregonstate.edu/



 
Insect collection for the phenology project. 2012. Photo by Lina DiGregorio Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) opportunity

We seek applicants for a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) position on a long-term study of plant and animal phenology at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest in the Central Cascades of Oregon. Check out our Opportunities page for more information.

 



 
Feb 17: Jerry Franklin talk to include historic role of HJA

Monday, February 17: Jerry Franklin, University of Washington. "Observations on the role of science and scientists in policy making, including the historic role of the H. J. Andrews"

10:00 - 11:00am, Nash 32, OSU Campus



 
Andrews Forest Newsletter, Fall 2013 Issue Andrews Forest Newsletter, Fall 2013 Issue

The Fall 2013 issue of the Andrews Forest Newsletter is now online at http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/newsletter

We invite you to explore the newsletter to learn about the people and the projects that make the Andrews Forest special.

  • Learn about the new Andrews Forest History Project
  • Meet some of our graduate students and researchers
  • Explore what our 50-year studies tell us about vegetation changes after logging
  • Find out how our Forest Service partners are connecting with the social component of natural resource management


 
Vine Maple in the Fall. Photo by Al Levno Andrews Forest Monthly Meeting. Nov 1, 9-11 AM

We will use this Monthly Meeting to share updates about research ideas for LTER7 (proposal due in March 2014) and to have discussion.

Also: The annual bigleaf maple big leaf contest will be judged at this meeting.  Bring your best specimen for a shot at the sweet grand prize (maple syrup!), and bragging rights for a whole year. 



 
maple leaves at the Andrews Forest. Photo by Lina DiGregorio Book reading: Robin Kimmerer. Oct 19.

Robin Kimmerer will read from her new book, “Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants,” on Saturday, Oct. 19, beginning at 7:30 p.m. at Oregon State University’s LaSells Stewart Center, C&E Auditorium. She’ll be joined by poet Alison Hawthorne Deming for an event celebrating the 10th anniversary of OSU Spring Creek Project’s Long-Term Ecological Reflections program. The program is free and open to all.



 
Terry Chapin Seminar on Stewardship Ecology, Terry Chapin, Oct 16.

The Andrews Forest LTER and the Spring Creek Project will be hosting a seminar by F. Stuart Chapin, III (Terry), titled, "Stewardship ecology: Research and actions to move the planet toward sustainability.”  Chapin is Professor Emeritus of Ecology, Department of Biology and Wildlife, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks. His research addresses the sustainability of ecosystems and human communities in a rapidly changing planet.

The seminar will be Wednesday, October 16, 4-5PM, in Richardson Hall 313. A reception will follow, hosted by OSU's Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society. 



 
Scientists and students conducting a fish survey at the Andrews Forest just before the government shutdown. Photo by Lina DiGregorio Research Affected by Government Shutdown

Research at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site has been affected by the government shutdown. Other LTER sites are also affected. Read more in the Greenwire article, "GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN: Shuttered parks, wildlife refuges hamstring long-term research projects".



 
Researchers and Students at Bunchgrass. Photo by Jeremy Monroe. Andrews LTER Monthly Meeting - Oct 4, 9-11 AM, RH 313

9-10 AM, Presentations:

History of Andrews Forest Science to Policy Relationships – presented by Fred Swanson

The new Andrews Forest History Project – led by historians Anita Guerrini and Sam Schmieding

10-11 AM, Discussions and Updates:

LTER7 Planning – drafts of conceptual models, themes/goals, and possible projects – led by Julia Jones.

The meeting will be held in Richardson Hall 313, on the OSU Campus.



 
Julia Jones. Photo by Lina DiGregorio. 2012. Seminar on Geomorphology of Western Cascades, Oct 1, 1PM

“Forest and Fluvial Geomorphology of the West Slope Western Cascades,” a free talk by Julia Jones, an Oregon State University hydrologist, will be held noon to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1 in Wilkinson Hall, room 108, on the OSU campus.



 
Monica Hubbard. Photo by Lina DiGregorio. PhD Defense: Oregon’s Integrated Water Resource Planning

"Oregon’s Integrated Water Resource Planning: Exploring Oregonian’s Knowledge Holding, Risk Perception, and Adaptive Capacity."  PhD defense by Monica Hubbard, OSU.

Tuesday, August 20 at 2:00

Richardson Hall 313.



 
Lissy Goralnik (front row left) visited with several OneTree collaborators in Fairbanks. OSU post-doctoral scholar visits UAF forest research group

College of Forestry, Oregon State University  post-doctoral scholar, Lissy Goralnik, visits University of Alaska Fairbanks' School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences.

http://snras.blogspot.com/2013/08/oregon-state-post-doctoral-scholar.html



 
HJA Day 2011 by Lina DiGregorio HJA Day: June 27, 2013

HJA Day is the annual field gathering at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest.  Activities will include field trips to sites in the Andrews Forest and presentations from researchers, student, and managers. Schedule at http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/hjaday.

 



 
Andrews Forest Newsletter Issue 14 New Issue of the Andrews Forest Newsletter

The newest issue of the Andrews Forest Newsletter is now online at http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/newsletter

We invite you to explore the newsletter to learn about the people and the projects that make the Andrews Forest special.  The Andrews Forest Newsletter is a semi-annual publication of the Andrews Forest Program. We welcome your feedback, ideas, and comments. Contact us at andrewsnewsletter@fsl.orst.edu.



 
hard hats and crew 2013 HJA Safety Day - June 20

HJA Safety Day is a field safety refresher that teaches safety procedures at the Andrews Forest. It covers facilities safety, communication, check-in/check-out and search activation, accident reporting, woods road driving, fire, human dangers, animal, terrain, and plant dangers, and field preparedness. During the 3 1/2 hours you will hear from various informed persons on these varied topics, with plenty of opportunities to ask questions and share insights.

We want the HJA to have another safe field season. We encourage all PI's to direct their field employees to attend, and ask all field workers to participate in the HJA Safety Day, Thursday, June 20, starting at 1:00 pm in the Andrews Forest Headquarters conference room.

To sign up, or for more information contact Kathy Keable 541-822-6303 or email.

 



 
First Aid 2013 CPR/First Aid Training at Andrews, June 24

Training will be Monday, June 24, 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM, at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest conference room. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training will be in the morning, First Aid training will be in the afternoon. The cost is $40 for both CPR and First Aid, or $30 for either one, plus $2.50 per person to offset the travel fee of the training provider. The provider is CPR WORKS, http://www.cpr-works.com/

Please email Kathy Keable the names of people wishing to attend, their affiliation (USFS (MRRD, PNW), USGS, OSU (with department)), and bring your index or charge number to the class to enter on the sign-in sheet (unaffiliated attendees can pay cash). The provider will bill each agency for the people attending. Space is not unlimited, so sign up early.

Prepare yourself for the unexpected. Please encourage your field personnel and students to attend.



 
Julia Jones. Photo by Lina DiGregorio Julia Jones awarded OSU's Woman of Achievement Award

Dr. Julia Jones, an Andrews Forest researcher and principal investigator, has been awarded the 2013 OSU Women's Center Woman of Achievement Award.  These awards honor the commitment to and contributions of women whose work has touched the lives of students and colleagues. 

Anyone is welcomed and enouraged to attend the awards ceremony on Friday, May 10th at 3:00 PM in Memorial Union lounge of the OSU Campus. A catered reception will follow the ceremony.



 
Temporary Road Repair as of Jan 26, 2012 USFS Road 15 closure May 14th

 The final phase of road work at the landslide site on Forest Road 15 (ca. 2 miles from highway 126) is proceeding on schedule.  Paving of this section is planned for Tuesday May 14th.  The road will be closed to all traffic from 9 AM until the following morning (May 15th).  For those who need to visit the Andrews Forest on May 14th there are several options: 1) arrive at the slide before 9AM and plan to spend the night of the 14th at the Station; 2) arrive before 9AM on the 14th and leave anytime that day via the USFS15-to-Deer Creek (USFS 2654)-to-Highway 126 route (a map of this route is still on our website at http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/lter/new/2012/DeerCreek_alt_access.pdf; 3) arrive and leave at any time you desire using the Deer Creek alternate route.  I have checked the route and it is snow free.  Deer Creek (USFS 2654) is in very good condition (recent thinning operations), while USFS 15 is in good condition except for the occasional pothole and a mile of well-developed washboard just west of Wolf Rock.  I clocked the route at 39 minutes from HJA headquarters to Hwy 126 when driving at a safe speed.  The highway 126 section from the Deer Creek road (2654) junction to the Blue River Reservoir Road (15) junction adds another 17 minutes to the trip up the McKenzie valley.  However, the normal route from highway 126 to HQ takes 7 minutes at a safe speed, meaning the Deer Creek route adds 49 minutes to a typical trip from Corvallis using highway 126.  I cannot speculate on whether it would be faster from Corvallis to drive highway 20 to 126 to Deer Creek than the I-5 - hwy 126 - Deer Creek route (Google Maps suggests that it is essentially two hours from Corvallis to the Deer Creek junction using either route).  Please do not attempt any other alternative routes, such as Hwy 20 directly to USFS Road 15, as you will encounter significant snow patches that will force you to turn around. 

 

One caveat: if there is significant rain on Tuesday the 14th, the paving will have to be postponed until the 15th.  Unless you receive an email announcement of a weather delay, assume the road will be closed on the 14th and open on the 15th (it is officially closed to public use from 1PM on Monday the 13th through 5AM on the 15th, but the closure for Andrews business does not begin until paving starts at 9 AM on the 14th).  Please let us know if you plan to travel across the slide zone after 1PM on the 13th or early morning on the 14th – I’ve been informed by the USFS Project Engineer that Andrews personnel do not need to carry a permit letter to cross the slide zone, but the official language about fines is eye opening (http://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5419689.pdf). 

 

Thank you for your flexibility in working around this final closure of road 15 to repair the damage from the 2012 landslide.  



 
Andrews Forest Children's Book: "Ellie's Log"

Andrews Forest Children's Book, "Ellie's Log"  http://www.ellieslog.org

"Ellie's Log, Exploring the Forest Where the Great Tree Fell" by Judith L. Li.  Illustrations by M. L. Herring.

Watch the book trailer video

The book is in print and available through booksellers.  Authur Judy Li will share the book at a special kids' book club meeting at the Corvallis Benton County Library, May 3, 3:30 PM.



 
Andrews Forest. Photo by Lina DiGregorio Andrews LTER Monthly Meeting - May 3, 9-11 AM, RH 313

9-10 AM, Presentations: Carbon Dynamics in Watershed 1

  • AIR - Simplified mass balance in mountainous terrain: Can we measure NEE in WS1? Chris Thomas
  • VEGETATION- Live and Dead Wood Dynamics in WS01. Mark Harmon and Becky Fasth
  • SOIL - What factors control soil C storage and efflux in complex mountain terrain? Fox Peterson and Kate Lajtha
  • WATER-  Fluxes and standing stocks of stream carbon - Alba Argerich and Sherri Johnson

 

 

10-11 AM, Discussions and Updates 

The meeting will be held in Richardson Hall 313, on the OSU Campus.



 
Andrews Forest creek. Photo by Lina DiGregorio Nitrogen Trends paper in Environmental Research Letters

'Trends in stream nitrogen concentrations for forested reference catchments across the USA' has been selected to appear in the monthly highlights collection of Environmental Research Letters (ERL).

 

To access the collection, please visit http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/page/2013%20monthly%20highlights

Full paper:  "Trends in stream nitrogen concentrations for forested reference catchments across the USA." A Argerich et al 2013 Environ. Res. Lett. 8 014039 doi:10.1088/1748-9326/8/1/014039 



 
Snow Queen (Syntheris reniformis). Photo by Lina DiGregorio. Andrews LTER Monthly Meeting - April 5, 9-11 AM, RH 313

9-10 AM, Presentations: 

The Andrews LTER Children's Book, "Ellie's Log, Exploring the Forest Where the Great Tree Fell". Presented by author Judith L. Li. 

“Trade-offs between Carbon and Forest Products in the west Cascades of Oregon.” Presented by Mark Harmon.

10-11 AM, Discussion: 

LTER 7 Survey results. Presented by Michael P. Nelson

 

The meeting will be held in Richardson Hall 313, on the OSU Campus.



 
Dr. Chelse Prather Presentations: Food web approach, and Philosophy in ecology

"A food web approach to ecosystems: how do consumers and their diversity affect ecosystem functioning?"

The effects of insect consumer organisms on ecosystem processes is not well-resolved in terrestrial ecosystems. Dr. Prather will talk about her studies looking at the effects on insects globally, from rainforests to prairie ecosystems.  Friday, March 1, 9-10 AM, Richardson Hall 313 (part of the LTER Monthly Meeting)

"The rise and fall of philosophy in ecology: Why and how to put the Ph back in your PhD"

The number of papers containing the words philosophy and ecology rises and declines sharply over about 25 years. Why was there this rise and fall of philosophy in ecology? Should there be a revival? Dr. Prather will discuss why and how to put philosophy back into the ecology PhD. Friday, March 1, 1 PM - 2 PM, Richardson Hall 313.

Chelse Prather is a Research Assistant Professor at the University of Houston. She received her BS in biology from the University of Kentucky, and her PhD from the University of Notre Dame.

She also had a short interdisciplinary postdoc at Florida State within the biology, history, and philosophy departments. She is generally interested in the complicated effects of animals on ecosystem functioning, and, conversely, the relative importance of factors that influence the distribution of animals.



 
Vanishing Act. Painting by Mindy Schnell Environmental Art on Display

Friday, February 1: 11 AM - 3 PM. Richardson Hall 107.

With inspiration from science and from Nature, artists and creative writers depict the world from four Long-Term Ecological Research sites – Andrews Forest in Oregon, Harvard Forest in Massachusetts, North Temperate Lakes in northern Wisconsin, and Bonanza Creek in central Alaska.  Please visit this one-day exhibition and share your thoughts on the value of arts and humanities in deepening our understanding of the natural and human-modified world.  The works on display include paintings, fiber art, poetry, prose, and sculpture; the creators’ intents range from simple, personal expression to public outreach. 

Brought to you by the Andrews Forest LTER Program.



 
Mack Creek by Tom Iraci Andrews Forest featured in blog by OSU Visiting Scholar

The Andrews Forest and the book about the Forest and its research program,"The Hidden Forest The Biography of an Ecosystem" by Jon Luoma, were featured in a recent blog by James H. Capshew, the Gordon/Horning Visiting Fellow at the Center for the Humanities, Oregon State University.



 
Icy Stream at the Andrews Forest. By Adam Kennedy Andrews LTER Monthly Meeting - 9am Friday, Feb 1 in RH 313

9-10 AM, Presentation:  "A food web approach to ecosystems: how do consumers and their diversity affect ecosystem functioning?"

The effects of insect consumer organisms on ecosystem processes is not well-resolved in terrestrial ecosystems. Dr. Prather will talk about her studies looking at the effects on insects globally, from rainforests to prairie ecosystems. 

10-11 AM, Discussion:  Continuing the conversation on Possible LTER7 themes and planning.



 
Field Work in Watershed 1 Andrews Forest Graduate Student GRA Support Award - 2013

Application deadline: December 31, 2012

The Andrews LTER program will award two Graduate Student GRA Support Awards in 2013-2014. We anticipate awarding one of these GRA awards for a student in science, and one for a student focused on science communication and education. The funding will provide full graduate-­-student support (stipend and tuition for MS or PhD) for one full year at OSU, starting as early as Spring term 2013, for each student and will be awarded on a competitive basis. The students’ work must be closely associated with the Andrews Forest program (conducted at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest or in a larger surrounding landscape if appropriate for the project goals, and/or makes use of Andrews Forest data). Priority will be given to research that directly supports the current LTER grant (LTER6).  Funds will be available starting Spring term 2013, and will run for one year.  These awards are for one year only, although students and projects funded in previous years may be considered for funding in future years on an equal basis with new applicants. 

Download award details and application



 
Andrews Forest Newsletter Fall 2012 Andrews Forest Newsletter - Fall 2012 Issue

The Fall 2012 issue of the Andrews Forest Newsletter includes stories on 60 years of streamgaging at the Andrews Forest, the Paradox of Cooling Streams, Ecological Forestry, the GREENHouse build out, and artwork from our first Writer-in-Residence at the Andrews Forest, Debby Kaspari.   We invite you to explore the newsletter to learn about the people and the projects that make the Andrews Forest special.

http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/lter/pubs/newsletter/Andrews_Forest_Newsletter_Fall_2012.pdf



 
ASM Working Group (aellison) Andrews Researchers Funded for LTER Synthesis Projects

The LTER Executive Board's annual call for proposals for LTER synthesis projects for 2013 aimed at synthesis working groups, individual post-docs, and training working groups was well received by Andrews LTER researchers. Nearly a quarter of total grants awarded in the recent grant competition went to Andrews researchers. (To see the original call for proposals and the complete list of awards visit http://intranet2.lternet.edu/proposal/3893.)

These grants will support the following Andrews and LTER projects:  

  

 

Synthesis Working Groups:

  • Soil Biogeochemistry: Synthesis of Past Data and Development of Protocols for a New Long-Term, Network-Wide Data Stream (Kate Lajtha)
  • Synthesis of stream ecosystem responses to nutrient enrichment at multiple trophic levels (Lydia Zeglin, Sherri Johnson)
  • Veg-DB Phase 2: Developing a cross-site system to improve development and access to synthetic vegetation databases (Mark Harmon)

 Individual Post-docs:

  • Atmospheric correction to LTER Landsat catalog (Theresa Valentine, Tom Spies)
  • Cross-site Analysis and Synthesis of Arts and Humanities Engagement within LTER (Michael Nelson, Fred Swanson, Hannah Gosnell)

 Training Working Groups:

  • Software tools and strategies for managing sensor networks (Don Henshaw)
  • Climate and streamflow seasonal trend analysis at LTER sites (Julia Jones, Chris Thomas)

 

 



 
Fox Peterson presents at HJA Day 2011. Photo by Tuan Pham Post-Harvest Influences in Complex Mountainous Terrain

Fox Peterson PhD defense, "Post-Harvest Hardwood Establishment Influences Anpp, Soil C and DOC Export in Complex Mountainous Terrain"

Monday, November 5, 2012 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM. Wilkinson Hall 203

Come see Fox Peterson's presentation on results from her work in Watershed 1 at the Andrews Forest.



 
Alternate access to HJA via Deer Creek HJA Road 15 Repair - September 10 - November 15

Repair to road 15 to the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest will occur between September 10 and November 15.  During this period road access from the McKenzie Highway 126 on USFS Road 15 will be limited due to repair of damage from the landslide that occurred along the Blue River Reservoir last winter.  This repair will involve building a rock embankment to stabilize the area and restore the original road prism, which will involve around 3000 dump truck loads of rock.  The work period will be from 9AM to 5PM daily.

The contractors doing the repairs have agreed to allow free transit across the slide area to Andrews visitors from 8-9AM and from 5-6PM.  From 9AM to 5PM the work area will be closed to traffic.  

After/before work hours (6PM – 8AM) there will be two gates blocking public access across the slide.  Andrews staff will have the combination or the key to the lock on the gate, which will allow us to facilitate transit across the slide area during the off-work hours.  

There are two alternate routes to the Andrews (pdf maps below) that will allow free access to the site at any time of day; both will add a significant amount of time to the trip.  The first is from Highway 126 north of the McKenzie River Ranger District office on the Deer Creek Road (USFS 2654) to USFS 15 (just NE of Wolf Rock) and down the Blue River Road to Andrews HQ.  This could add as much as an hour to a trip to the Andrews from the Eugene/Springfield Area.  For those coming from the north, Highway 20 connects with USFS 15 Road near Iron Mountain, and one can drive the full extent of the 15 Road to HQ.  This may add anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour to the trip from Corvallis.  We can send a scanned PDF map of either route to those who are interested in taking it.  

Given the above constraints on travel to HJA, it is very important to plan the route and stick to whatever schedule you decide on - at least if it involves crossing the landslide work zone.  If you can schedule your travel such that you are crossing the slide zone during the 8-9AM and 5-6PM time slots that will be the smoothest scenario.  The next easiest will be to plan to hit the slide zone in the 6PM - 8AM window.  The two alternate routes provide complete flexibility in travel, but do involve an investment of up to two extra hours in total transit to and from the HJA.  If you are planning on coming to the Andrews, please let us know your plans so that we can facilitate access (depending on the lock situation at the gates, we may need to have someone there to meet you and get you through the gates).   

We apologize for the inconvenience this road work will cause, but this is the only window in which weather and reservoir levels allow for a successful repair operation.  

Alternative access routes maps (pdf):

     15RD from Hwy 20 near Iron Mountain (Tombstone Pass)

     Deer Creek from Hwy 126 east of McKenzie Bridge

 **WARNING for the Deer Creek alternative route - log trucks are hauling on Deer Creek Road.  Be very careful if you choose this route.

 

For more updated information contact Kathy Keable or Mark Schulze.

 

 



 
Weather at Primary Meteorological Station, Andrews Forest Climate Station Graphs Back Online

Graphs of the past 7 day data from the benchmark meteorolgical station and gauging stations are back online. This page is still under construction and may continue to evolve, but the graphs will be available here.   They are accessed from Weather Station Data at the bottom of the home page.  Various photo cams across the Andrews are also availabe here.  The photo cams include phenology cams, but also the HJA site web cam and a construction web cam of the new green building.  Please send us your feedback.



 
Andrews LTER Monthly Meeting - 9am Friday, Oct 5 RH313

Its school time and we will be starting the monthly Andrews LTER meetings again.  These happen the first Friday of each month in Richardson Hall 313, OSU Campus. All are welcome to attend.

9am - Science Hour:  Dr. Steve Wondzell, of USFS Pacific Northwest Research Station, will be talking about his stream research at the Andrews and throughout the NW.  His topic is "Water Temperature Regimes in Small Streams: Forest Harvest, Riparian Buffers, and Hyporheic Exchange"

10 am - Meeting and Discussion

The LTER All Scientists Meeting occurred mid-Sept in Estes Park, CO and Andrews LTER was well represented! A portion of this Friday’s monthly meeting will be dedicated to sharing perspectives from the ASM and discussing follow-up ideas and next steps - kind of a scientific jam session. If you had a poster, please plan to bring it and we can view all the wonderful posters in one place. If you led or participated in a great session, give us the highlights.

We'll have a short discussion of a research/site use proposal for a strawberry common garden at HJA Vanilla Leaf meadow.

Dr. Michael Nelson, new Spaniol Chair in COF and new Lead PI of our LTER, has arrived and is getting settled. You'll be hearing more from him soon.



 
YMCA at Estes Park, Colorado 2012 LTER All Scientists Meeting (ASM), September 10-13

 We encourage as many people from the Andrews Forest LTER to attend as possible. This is an important meeting in a beautiful location, and a great opportunity to network with other researchers and students to meet and interchange ideas.  One important part of this meeting is the development of working groups focused on specific topics and goals.  There is also a graduate student Symposium on September 9, the day before the main ASM begins.

For more information: http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/outreach/asm.cfm?topnav=187



 
Canopy Connections Video clip Canopy Connections Video wins a Northwest Regional Emmy

The Canopy Connections video won a Northwest Regional Emmy for best Photography/Editing. The link to the video is

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdPFNQhWmdA

Congratulations to Quinn Moticka and Sreang C Hok who were primary editors and did all of the camera work.

Canopy Connections is an experiential learning program at the Andrews Forest for Oregon middle school classes developed by three partner institutions: University of Oregon Environmental Leadership Program, The Pacific Tree Climbing Institute, and the US Forest Service PNW Station. The Pacific Northwest is home to some magnificent old-growth forests. Unfortunately, many local children have never had the opportunity to explore this enchanting ecosystem first-hand. In response, the Canopy Connections Team develops a unique fieldtrip experience-one that gives middle-school students an opportunity to climb into the canopy of an old-growth forest. The mission is to inspire a sense of wonder and respect for our natural world through a curriculum that integrates science, art, creative writing. Not only does the program enrich the curriculum for regional K-12 schools, the program provides excellent training in ecology and science education for a cohort of 9 undergraduate and graduate Environmental Science students each year.

Since the first full season of the program in 2009, 450 students have participated in the program. Recruitment of classes prioritizes schools with a high proportion students receiving free and reduced lunch. Although funded by private donations, foundations and the USFS More-Kids-in-the-Woods program, Canopy Connections leverages the investment in LTER research as an effective mechanism for communicating ecological insights to beginning science students.



 
Freshwater Futures preview by Freshwaters Illustrated Freshwater Futures Preview Video

Freshwater Illustrated has posted the preview video that was featured at the Ecological Reflections exhibit. The film serves as a preview of the forthcoming short film series, Freshwater Futures, which highlights water-related research and societal needs in NSF Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites across the country. Some of the film footage in the preview is from the Andrews Forest LTER; additional footage from the Andrews Forest will be added for the final series.

see the preview video at http://vimeo.com/39655229



 
Andrews Forest Newsletter Spring 2012 Andrews Forest Newsletter: Spring 2012

The Spring 2012 issue of the Andrews Forest Newsletter is available online at http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/lter/pubs/newsletter.cfm?topnav=170 

Read about decadal reporting of the LTER network, the GREEN House project, radioactive fallout detection, and more.



 
Lookout Creek, Andrews Forest. By Tom Iraci. Monthly Meeting: Friday, May 4, 9-11 AM

The next Andrews Forest LTER Monthly Meeting will be Friday, May 4, 9-11AM, in Richardson Hall 313.  Science Hour, 9-10AM, will feature Julia Jones, Professor, CEAOS, OSU. The talk is titled  “Ecological and engineered resilience of water supply response to climate change – lessons from long-term records.”  The general meeting will be held 10-11 AM and will cover news, announcements, and information sharing.



 
Jack Booth at Cascade Head Experimental Forest. 1959. Photo courtesy USFS. In Memoriam - Jack Booth

It is with great sadness that we report the passing of Jack Booth, a superb technician that worked for the Pacific Northwest Station from 1956 to 1986 and contributed significantly to the research program at the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest.  While Jack’s duty station was at the Cascade Experimental Forest, he helped develop research at the Andrews Forest by laying out vegetation plots, making key measurements, building important structures such as the safety cabins and the original shelters that became today’s headquarters complex.  One of his final contributions was to help in the installation of the 200-year log decomposition experiment.  Jack will be remembered for his cheerful, can-do attitude and sense of humor (who else would name the machete used to keep trails open “Dr. Hackenbush”?) that kept many of us going when times were tough.  We extend our deepest sympathies to Jack’s family on their loss.



 
Michael P. Nelson Michael Nelson named as new Andrews Forest LTER Lead PI

Dr. Michael Nelson has formally agreed to come to OSU to become the next Ruth H. Spaniol Chair of Natural Resources as well as the next Lead Principle Investigator for the Andrews Forest LTER program.

Michael is a writer, teacher, speaker, consultant, and professor of environmental ethics and philosophy, currently at Michigan State University. He is also the philosopher in residence of the Isle Royale Wolf-Moose Project, the longest continuous study of a predator-prey system in the world. Michael is the co-founder/co-director of the Conservation Ethics Group, an award-winning environmental ethics consultancy group fusing ethics with social and ecological science. He is the author of many articles, and the author or editor of a number of books, in and around the area of environmental ethics. More information is available on Michael’s website: http://www.michaelpnelson.com  

Michael will be starting his new position with OSU and the Andrews Forest LTER in mid-August.  We look forward to working with Michael and to the talents and new perspectives he will bring to the program.



 
Temporary Road Repair as of Jan 26, 2012 Road to Andrews Forest Reopened to Public

The road to the Andrews Forest (Blue River Reservoir Road, USFS Rd 15) will be open to public use on April 6, 2012. A one-lane temporary road repair now enables safe transit across the site of the January 19th landslide.  Please be careful when approaching and crossing the landslide on this narrow gravel track.  Anticipate oncoming traffic and lines at the repair site.  Permanent repairs to restore two-lane access may begin in August 2012.  Delays or closures associated with those repairs will be announced on this website.  

Photos below were taken on January 19, 2012, the day of the slide, and show initial road damage. Images by Fred Bierlmaier.

 

Temporary road repair; a week after the slide:

 

 

 



 
Weir at Watershed 2 at the Andrews Forest. Photo by Don Henshaw. Job Opportunities at the Andrews Forest

Keep an eye on the Opportunities page of our website for current employment opportunities at the Andrews Forest.



 
Sarah Frey (photo: OSU Marketing Communications) LTER Graduate Student, Sarah Frey, featured in Terra

Andrews Forest LTER Graduate Student, Sarah Frey, is highlighted in OSU's Terra magazine. Sarah's research on resident and migratory birds investigates "the role of temperature in small-scale species distributions. The buffering capacity of “microclimatic refugia” (habitat havens she characterizes as “little nooks and crannies”) in mountainous terrain could be critical as birds make adjustments to a fluctuating environment in nesting, breeding and foraging." Full Story, Terra

Sarah was also featured in the Spring 2011 issue of the Andrews Forest Newsletter.



 
Special Presentation: International LTER Teacher Collaboration

February 29, 10:00 AM.  Richardson Hall 115

Jill Semlick, Portland Public School District High School Biology teacher, will present a presentation titled: International Long-Term Ecological Research Teacher Collaboration: sharing data with schools in Israel.

Ms. Semlick will tell us about her involvement in an international decomposition study for high school students with the Israeli Long-Term Ecological Research site.



 
Ruth Spaniol Chair in Natural Resources Schedule Andrews LTER Lead PI Candidate Seminar - Feb 13 and 14

OSU's Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society is conducting interviews for the Ruth Spaniol Chair in Natural Resources.  The successful candidate will hold a tenured teaching and research position and will serve as the lead PI for the H.J. Andrews Forest LTER research program. Andrews LTER community members are strongly encouraged to attend the seminars and provide feedback.

Each candidate will present a Vision and a Teaching Seminar.  All Seminars are in Richardson Hall 313. Receptions will follow each Vision Seminar.

Feedback for each candidate can be provide on the Candidate Feedback Form.

Ruth Spaniol Chair of Natural of Natural Resources in the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society Position Description.

  

Ruth Spaniol Chair in Natural Resources Invited Candidates:

January 19 &20 - Dr. Rhett Jackson, Professor of Hydrology, University of Georgia (Seminar Video)

January 23 & 24 - Dr. Walter Dodds, University Distinguished Professor in Biology, Kansas State University  (Seminar Video

January  26 & 27- Dr. Michael Nelson, Associate Professor of Environmental Ethics and Philosophy, Michigan State University (Seminar Video)

February 13 & 14 - Dr. Lucinda Johnson, Director and Senior Research Associate, Center for Water and the Environment, Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota (Seminar Video)

 



 
Met station in snow at the Andrews Forest.by Lina DiGregorio. 2008. Seminar: Ecohydrology in Canada's southern Rocky Mountains

 

Dr. Sarah Boon, Assistant Professor, Geography, University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, will be at OSU on sabbatical for the month of February. She is interested in examining snow-related hydrology at the Andrews Forest.

Dr. Boon will discuss her current research on Cold Regions Ecohydrology in Canada's southern Rocky Mountains  during a Brown Bag Seminar, Wednesday, February 8, noon - 1 PM, in Richardson Hall 115.

And she will be available afterwards to make connections for future discussions.

 

 



 
Andrews Forest Newsletter Andrews Forest Newsletter Fall 2011 Issue

The Fall 2011 issue of the Andrews Forest Newsletter is online at http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/lter/pubs/newsletter.cfm?topnav=170.

Highlights of this issue include stories about:

• Tall Trees and Topography

• Wireless Connections in the Forest

• an updated Andrews Forest Map

• research programs for undergraduates

 

We invite you to explore the newsletter to learn about the people and the projects that make the Andrews Forest special.

 

Happy Reading!

Lina DiGregorio (OSU),Fred Swanson (USFS PNW)

 



 
Welcome to the New Andrews Website

The Andrew Forest LTER is launched a new and improved website. Improved features include advance searching on databases and publications, audience specific pathways, news and highlights on the home page, and a new look and feel.  We welcome your comments and ideas.



 
New Andrews Forest Map Now Available

The new, updated map for the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest is available online. Hard copies can be obtained at the Forest Science Lab in Corvallis or at the Andrews Forest Headquarters.



 
Poster session of the 2011 Andrews Forest LTER Symposium By Lina DiGregorio Andrews Forest 2011 LTER Symposium

The 2011 Andrews Forest LTER Symposium, held April 18-19, featured presentations and posters that highlighted research, management, and education programs. Download the agenda and poster abstracts at: http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/lter/pubs/annlsymp/annsymp.cfm?year=12&topnav=43



 
Andrews Newsletter Cover The Spring 2011 issue of the Andrews Forest Newsletter

The Spring 2001 issue of the Andrews Forest Newsletter is now on-line at http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/pub/newsletter.cfm?topnav=170 .

Highlights of this issue include stories about:

  • Long-term stream chemistry records
  • Perspectives and artwork from visiting scholars
  • Linking land managers and researchers
  • and "the Hidden Forest" book about the Andrews Forest

We invite you to explore the newsletter to learn about the people and the projects that make the Andrews Forest special.

Happy Reading!  Lina DiGregorio (OSU) and Fred Swanson (USFS PNW)



 
Canopy Connections Funded through More Kids in the Woods

The Canopy Connections program at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest received federal funding through the "More Kids in the Woods" program, designed to promote active lifestyles and connect kids to nature. Through Canopy Connections "quiet observation time, creative writing, art and science inquiry projects are wrapped around each participant's personal guided ascent seventy feet above the forest floor into the canopy of an old-growth Douglas-fir tree." The program serves elementary school students of Oregon.



 
Canopy Connections

Canopy Connections brings students into the canopy of the old-growth forest. Under the guidance of professional tree climbers, students ascend several stories into an old-growth canopy using specialized climbing gear and rope. While settled in “treeboats” high up in the canopy, students engage in creative writing, art, science inquiry projects, and quiet observation time. The program is designed to provide a transformational experience and to help students appreciate the outdoor world as well as their own capabilities. In 2010, 185 middle and high school students participated in the Canopy Connections program at the Andrews Forest. Students climbed into the old-growth tree canopy, studied the characteristics of old growth forests, discovered medicinal and food plants, and learned about tree anatomy. Funding for the program is provided by donations to the Andrews Forest Fund. Additional donations would allow the program to continue in the future. Canopy Connections is a partnership between the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, the Environmental Leadership Program at the University of Oregon, and the Pacific Tree Climbing Institute.



 
Ground-truthing LiDAR Data from the top of a tree
Forest researchers are swinging from the trees—all in a day of good work. Researchers at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest climbed 86 meters (280 ft) into the canopy to ground-truth canopy height data obtained through LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging). With LiDAR data, scientists are able to create 3D images of landscape topography and canopy structure at a detail not available previously.

OSU researcher, Matthew Betts, and USFS researcher, Tom Spies, discussed some of the ways that the LiDAR data are being used—from predicting bird species presence to calculating carbon storage of forests.



 
Oregon Public Broadcasting visits the Andrews Forest
June 26, 2010 marked the 20th anniversary of one of the most controversial decisions ever for Northwest forests. On June 26th, 1990, the Northern Spotted Owl was put on the Endangered Species list. Scientists at the time were worried the Northern Spotted Owl was on the brink of extinction.

But loggers feared those protections would mean the end of their industry. 20 years later, both the owl and the timber industry are hanging on, as Rob Manning reports.



 
Andrews Forest Researchers make new discoveries on how water moves through soil
A new study by Renee Brooks (Environmental Protection Agency), Holly Barnard (OSU), Jeff McDonnell (OSU), and Rob Coulumbe (Dynamac) showed — much to the surprise of the researchers — that soil clings tenaciously to the first precipitation after a dry summer, and holds it so tightly that it almost never mixes with other water.

The research was published online in Nature Geoscience.



 
Andrews Forest LTEReflections Writer-in-Residence Receives Burroughs Award
Scott Russell Sanders's essay, Mind in the Forest, written from his recent Andrews Forest LTEReflections residency, won the 2009 Burroughs Award for the best nature essay. The essay was published in Orion Magazine.


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