Fast Facts

-11
degrees Fahrenheit, coldest temperature recorded

The lowest temperature recorded at the Andrews Forest was -11 Fahrenheit (-24 degrees celsius), taken at the VANMET meterological station. Climate measurements, including temperature, rainfall, and windspeed, have been recorded at the Andrews Forest for decades, allowing scientists to watch for trends and make comparisions over time. Learn more about our climate research on our Research Programs page or find out more about locations and instruments on our Climate Stations page. 

164
bird species found on the Andrews Forest

The Andrews Forest is home to resident birds, such as the Varied Thrush and the the iconic Northern Spotted Owl, which stay all year round. The Forest is also home to migratory birds, such as the Black-Throated Grey Warbler and the Swainson's Thrush, which spend the summer breeding season at the Andrews Forest and fly south for the summer. The full list of birds can be found on our Species List.

3,100+
invertebrate species found in the forest

Invertebrates, which include insects, spiders, centipedes, and slugs, number more than 3,100 at the Andrews Forest, with the possibility of many more species to be found and documented. See our species lists for a full list of the invertebrate species that have been documented...so far.

53
species of mammals found at the Andrews Forest

The fifty three species of mammals recorded at the Andrews Forest include black bear, flying squirrel, deer, and red tree voles. To learn more about what animals live at the forest, see our Species List page.

1951
date of first timber harvest

The first timber harvest at the Andrews Forest occurred in 1951. Scientists initiated three sets of experimental watersheds designed to study the effects of logging on hydrology, sediment yield, and nutrient losses. Treatments included clearcutting and partial cutting, and one watershed was left in its “natural” forested condition as a control. Learn more about the history of the Forest on our History page.

7
feet, average annual rainfall

The amount of rain that falls at the Andrews Forest over a whole year is 7 feet (2.1 meters). That's 6 inches (15 centimeters) more than the height of LeBron James the basketball player!

505
plant species found on the Andrews Forest

Plant species at the Andrews Forest include enormous Douglas fir trees, which can reach 300 feet tall, and the tiniest mosses. The 505 species recorded include plants with flowers, cones, catkins, and fruits. The full list of plants species can be found on our Species Lists page. 

299
feet and three inches, the tallest tree at the Andrews Forest

The tallest tree on the Andrews Forest, a Douglas Fir, was first identified by LIDAR imaging in 2008. The height of the tree was verified in 2009 with a measuring tape! The tree had a healthy leader, or growing tip, so it may be well over 300 feet by now. As a point of comparison, the Statue of Liberty stands at 305 feet tall, including her base. 

2.2
seconds, Lookout Creek's average water discharge is equivalent to one concrete truck every 2.2 seconds

Lookout Creek’s average discharge is the equivalent of a fully-loaded concrete truck rumbling down the river bed every 2.2 seconds!

Lookout Ck mean annual discharge - 121.83 cubic feet per second (cfs)

A standard concrete truck holds 10 cubic yards or 270 cubic feet (cf).

270 cf ÷ 121.83 cfs = 2.21 s

Concrete trucks appear to be 7.168 m long (google) and if you chained them, bumper to bumper with no space in between, the “train of concrete trucks” would be traveling 7.25 mph.

With a more reasonable following distance of a couple of truck lengths, you’d have a never ending line of concrete trucks moving around 25 miles an hour!

(photo from Fortrans Inc)

40%
old-growth trees covering total areas

Most of the Andrews Forest is covered in dense forest. Huge, iconic Pacific Northwest old-growth conifer forests grow here with cedar, hemlock, and moss-draped ancient Douglas fir trees. See our Forest Description page for more information.

25%
of the Andrews Forest area harvested for timber

The first timber harvest at the Andrews Forest occurred in 1951 to study the effects of logging on hydrology, sediment yield, and nutrient losses. Later harvests were done to test different harvesting techniques. Learn more about the history of the Forest on our History page.

14
feet, largest snowpack recorded at the Andrews Forest

The largest snowpack recorded at the Andrews Forest was 4.4 meters (or 14 feet), at the Upper Lookout Meterological Station in 2008. The water storage in the snowpack on this date was equal to a depth of 1.56 meters (or 5 feet) of liquid water. Learn more about our climate measurements on our Research Programs page.

5,340
feet, maximum elevation in the forest

Elevation ranges from 1,350 to 5,340 feet (410 to 1630 m) above sea level.  See the Forest Description for more information. 

106
degrees Fahrenheit, hottest temperature recorded

The highest temperature recorded at the Andrews Forest is 106 Fahrenheit (41 degrees celsius), taken at a fan-aspirated shield at the PRIMET meterological stations. Climate measures, including temperature, rainfall, and windspeed, have been recorded at the Andrews Forest for decades, allowing scientists to watch for trends and make comparisions over time. Learn more about our climate research on our Research Programs page or find out more about locations and instruments on our Climate Stations page. 

9
species of fish found at the Andrews Forest

The nine species of fish found at the Andrews Forest live in the small, cold streams that flow through the forest. The species include the cutthroat trout, the mottled sculpin, and the speckled dace. To learn more about the kinds of fish and other creatures at the Andrews Forest, see our Species Lists page.

20
species of reptiles and amphibians found at the Andrews Forest

Twenty different species of reptiles (which include lizards) and amphibians (which include salamanders) can be found at the Andrews Forest. The rough-skinned newt (Taricha granulosa) is so commonplace at the Forest that it has taken on the role of mascot, appearing in the Andrews Forest logo.  The Pacific Giant Salamander (Dicamptodon ensatus), fondly nicknamed Dicamp by researchers, can reach up to 12 inches (30 cm) long. The Dicamp is subject of an ongoing study, 30 years running, that tracks the size and locations of salamanders and fish in a section of Mack Creek at the Andrews Forest. Learn more on our Research Programs page and on our Species Lists page.

15,800
total acres in the drainage basin of Lookout Creek

The Andrews Forest is situated in the western Cascade Range of Oregon, and covers the entire 15,800-acre (6400-ha) drainage basin of Lookout Creek.